Event Title

Modeling the Latent Reservoir in the Dynamics of HIV Infection with CTL Memory

Session Title

STEM and Biomedical Research

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor

Zachary Abernathy, Ph.D., and Kristen Abernathy, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Mathematics

Description

In this project, we model the dynamics of HIV-1 latently infected cells under the effects of a natural immune response. Our purpose in this model is to study the long-term effects of CTL memory on viral load. We establish the existence of equilibria and the global asymptotic stability of the disease-free equilibrium based on the rate that cells are latently versus actively infected. We then perform numerical simulations to illustrate the stability behavior of immune-free and internal equilibria. Furthermore, we demonstrate that anti-retroviral therapy can stimulate a memory response and reduce the viral load in the case when all equilibra exist.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Symposium and Poster Session, Winthrop University, June and October 2019; UNCG Regional Mathematics and Statistics Conference, Greensboro, North Carolina, November 2019

Grant Support?

Supported by an SC INBRE grant from the National Institute for General Medical Sciences (NIH-NIGMS)

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 24th, 12:00 AM

Modeling the Latent Reservoir in the Dynamics of HIV Infection with CTL Memory

In this project, we model the dynamics of HIV-1 latently infected cells under the effects of a natural immune response. Our purpose in this model is to study the long-term effects of CTL memory on viral load. We establish the existence of equilibria and the global asymptotic stability of the disease-free equilibrium based on the rate that cells are latently versus actively infected. We then perform numerical simulations to illustrate the stability behavior of immune-free and internal equilibria. Furthermore, we demonstrate that anti-retroviral therapy can stimulate a memory response and reduce the viral load in the case when all equilibra exist.