Event Title

Young Adults’ Attachment to Cell Phones, Significant Others, and Marijuana

Poster Number

094

Faculty Mentor

Merry Sleigh, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Psychology

Location

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

Start Date

12-4-2019 2:15 PM

End Date

April 2019

Description

We examined young adults’ attachment to their cell phones, parents, friends, significant others, pets, and marijuana. Participants were 120 young adults (74% women; 48% Caucasian) with a mean age of 20.40 (SD = 2.14). Participants evaluated their cell phone usage and reliance with a series of published questionnaires. We used the same reliance statements again, but modified the wording to assess participants' level of reliance on the parent to whom they were emotionally closest. The same statements were modified again to assess participants' level of reliance on the pet to which they have felt closest, followed by the best friend, significant romantic other, and marijuana. Next, participants responded to the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale and a self-esteem measure. Results revealed that young adults’ attachment levels to their phones might exceed their attachment levels to most people in their lives, and this finding held true across race and gender in our sample. Participants ranked their romantic partners as their top attachment objects immediately followed by their cell phones. Next, participants ranked their attachment highest with their best friends, parents, and pets. Attachment to marijuana among users was ranked lowest. This ranking might reflect social desirability; however, many adults admitted their marijuana use and reported fairly high levels of drug attachment. The more attached users were to the drug, the more they relied on their cell phone and the less connected they were to significant others. These findings suggest that attachment to one object or person can impact attachment to others.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Annual Meeting, Jacksonville, Florida, March 2019

Course Assignment

PSYC 302 – Sleigh

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Apr 12th, 2:15 PM Apr 12th, 4:15 PM

Young Adults’ Attachment to Cell Phones, Significant Others, and Marijuana

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

We examined young adults’ attachment to their cell phones, parents, friends, significant others, pets, and marijuana. Participants were 120 young adults (74% women; 48% Caucasian) with a mean age of 20.40 (SD = 2.14). Participants evaluated their cell phone usage and reliance with a series of published questionnaires. We used the same reliance statements again, but modified the wording to assess participants' level of reliance on the parent to whom they were emotionally closest. The same statements were modified again to assess participants' level of reliance on the pet to which they have felt closest, followed by the best friend, significant romantic other, and marijuana. Next, participants responded to the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale and a self-esteem measure. Results revealed that young adults’ attachment levels to their phones might exceed their attachment levels to most people in their lives, and this finding held true across race and gender in our sample. Participants ranked their romantic partners as their top attachment objects immediately followed by their cell phones. Next, participants ranked their attachment highest with their best friends, parents, and pets. Attachment to marijuana among users was ranked lowest. This ranking might reflect social desirability; however, many adults admitted their marijuana use and reported fairly high levels of drug attachment. The more attached users were to the drug, the more they relied on their cell phone and the less connected they were to significant others. These findings suggest that attachment to one object or person can impact attachment to others.