Event Title

SDO Leadership Preferences

Poster Number

083

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Psychology

Honors Thesis Committee

Jeff Sinn, Ph.D.; Matthew Hayes, Ph.D.; and Sarah Reiland, Ph.D.

Location

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

Start Date

12-4-2019 2:15 PM

End Date

April 2019

Description

Researchers typically view Social Dominance Orientation (SDO) as a hierarchy-favoring disposition favoring support for existing social hierarchies. However, this interpretation does not offer any explicit sociofunctional benefits for those holding this preference. In contrast, recent research suggests SDO may represent a fast-life, pro-self exploitation strategy. Using a survey designed to compare racial preferences and interpersonal orientation (i.e., kind, cold, competitive, or sadistic), we hypothesized that individuals high in SDO would prefer (1) high-status (European American) leaders, (2) leaders who signal a willingness to tolerate exploitation (sadistic leaders), and (3) sadistic leaders more than European American leaders. In the present study, we examined whether participants would choose leaders who reinforced racial hierarchies or provided opportunities for exploitation. We manipulated leader race (European American, African American, or Hispanic/Latino) and interpersonal orientation (kind, cold, competitive, or sadistic). We predicted SDO would interact more strongly with interpersonal orientation than race, so that high-SDO individuals would show more of a preference for sadistic leaders than European American leaders. Preliminary results suggest that participants high in SDO favor cruel and sadistic leaders over kind leaders, supporting our hypothesis.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 2:15 PM Apr 12th, 4:15 PM

SDO Leadership Preferences

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

Researchers typically view Social Dominance Orientation (SDO) as a hierarchy-favoring disposition favoring support for existing social hierarchies. However, this interpretation does not offer any explicit sociofunctional benefits for those holding this preference. In contrast, recent research suggests SDO may represent a fast-life, pro-self exploitation strategy. Using a survey designed to compare racial preferences and interpersonal orientation (i.e., kind, cold, competitive, or sadistic), we hypothesized that individuals high in SDO would prefer (1) high-status (European American) leaders, (2) leaders who signal a willingness to tolerate exploitation (sadistic leaders), and (3) sadistic leaders more than European American leaders. In the present study, we examined whether participants would choose leaders who reinforced racial hierarchies or provided opportunities for exploitation. We manipulated leader race (European American, African American, or Hispanic/Latino) and interpersonal orientation (kind, cold, competitive, or sadistic). We predicted SDO would interact more strongly with interpersonal orientation than race, so that high-SDO individuals would show more of a preference for sadistic leaders than European American leaders. Preliminary results suggest that participants high in SDO favor cruel and sadistic leaders over kind leaders, supporting our hypothesis.