Event Title

Implications for Successful Aging in Jamaica

Poster Number

080

Faculty Mentor

Merry Sleigh, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Psychology

Location

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

Start Date

12-4-2019 2:15 PM

End Date

April 2019

Description

Since the 1960s, Jamaica’s population has been “greying,” or trending toward an increase in life expectancy and a decrease in fertility. This is a mainly a result of two factors: reduced fertility, and reduced mortality as a result of advances in medicine and public health. It is projected that in 2015, nearly a quarter of the Caribbean’s population will be over sixty years old, and as of today the Jamaican life expectancy is at nearly seventy-six. Because of this phenomenon, the overall quality of life should be greatly considered for this population. One of the ways in which this can be measured is by using the factors that result in successful aging: absence of disease and disability, engagement with life, and high cognitive and physical function. When these factors are evaluated, then it can become easier to answer this question: how can the quality of life of the Jamaican population over sixty be improved so that successful aging can take place?

Course Assignment

PSYC 471, 472 – Sleigh

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Apr 12th, 2:15 PM Apr 12th, 4:15 PM

Implications for Successful Aging in Jamaica

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

Since the 1960s, Jamaica’s population has been “greying,” or trending toward an increase in life expectancy and a decrease in fertility. This is a mainly a result of two factors: reduced fertility, and reduced mortality as a result of advances in medicine and public health. It is projected that in 2015, nearly a quarter of the Caribbean’s population will be over sixty years old, and as of today the Jamaican life expectancy is at nearly seventy-six. Because of this phenomenon, the overall quality of life should be greatly considered for this population. One of the ways in which this can be measured is by using the factors that result in successful aging: absence of disease and disability, engagement with life, and high cognitive and physical function. When these factors are evaluated, then it can become easier to answer this question: how can the quality of life of the Jamaican population over sixty be improved so that successful aging can take place?