Event Title

The Relationship Between Exercise and Depression

Poster Number

061

Faculty Mentor

Joni Boyd, Ph.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Physical Education, Sport, and Human Performance

Location

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

Start Date

12-4-2019 2:15 PM

End Date

April 2019

Description

The purpose of this review of literature is to examine how the symptoms of depression are impacted by exercise. Research shows that mental health issues are growing across the board; and within this, the number of those suffering from depression is increasing, as well. It is known that about 300 million people around the world suffer from depression, and approximately 15% of adults will experience at least one depressive episode in their lives. Women are twice as likely as men to experience depression. Additionally, patients who have suffered from other diseases or medical conditions are more likely to experience depression than those who have not. Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a highly prevalent issue with low remission rates. MDD is predicted to be the second leading cause of disability worldwide by the year 2020. This review examines multiple studies that explore the efficacy of exercise as a treatment method for depression. These studies suggest that exercise provides the same results as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline and may be more cost effective and available for patients. In addition, exercise provides a number of other benefits to the body, such as more energy and cardioprotection. The results provided in this review of literature suggest that exercise can work as a preventative measure for depressive symptoms, can work as treatment for depression, and can result in response and remission in patients with depressive disorders.

Course Assignment

PESH 381 – Boyd

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Apr 12th, 2:15 PM Apr 12th, 4:15 PM

The Relationship Between Exercise and Depression

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

The purpose of this review of literature is to examine how the symptoms of depression are impacted by exercise. Research shows that mental health issues are growing across the board; and within this, the number of those suffering from depression is increasing, as well. It is known that about 300 million people around the world suffer from depression, and approximately 15% of adults will experience at least one depressive episode in their lives. Women are twice as likely as men to experience depression. Additionally, patients who have suffered from other diseases or medical conditions are more likely to experience depression than those who have not. Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a highly prevalent issue with low remission rates. MDD is predicted to be the second leading cause of disability worldwide by the year 2020. This review examines multiple studies that explore the efficacy of exercise as a treatment method for depression. These studies suggest that exercise provides the same results as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline and may be more cost effective and available for patients. In addition, exercise provides a number of other benefits to the body, such as more energy and cardioprotection. The results provided in this review of literature suggest that exercise can work as a preventative measure for depressive symptoms, can work as treatment for depression, and can result in response and remission in patients with depressive disorders.