Event Title

The Effect of Ankle Dorsiflexion Range of Motion on Injury Prevention and Sport Performance

Poster Number

062

Faculty Mentor

Joni Boyd, Ph.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Physical Education, Sport, and Human Performance

Location

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

Start Date

12-4-2019 2:15 PM

End Date

April 2019

Description

The purpose of this review of literature is to examine the importance of increasing ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ADROM) for safety and performance in athletes. This review examines studies that demonstrate common static stretching times for increasing ADROM are ineffective and can even decrease athletic performance. Due to the fact that static stretching has no effect on ADROM, athletes with limited ADROM are left vulnerable to injury. It was found that limited ADROM can be a direct cause of patellofemoral pain. Additionally, limited ADROM was found to place the knee in vulnerable positions during a squat that could increase chance of injury. Many strength coaches have tried to correct this problem in training with Olympic weightlifting shoes. While Olympic weightlifting shoes can compensate for limited ADROM by elevating the heel and therefore decreasing risk of injury in training, these shoes are not worn in competition and consequently leave an athlete vulnerable to injury. A new method of increasing ADROM, floss bands, have been shown to significantly increase ankle ADROM and even jump height in athletes. Continued research into floss bands and new techniques such as body tempering devices should be investigated as new soft tissue mobilization and joint range of motion tools.

Course Assignment

EXSC 381 – Boyd

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Apr 12th, 2:15 PM Apr 12th, 4:15 PM

The Effect of Ankle Dorsiflexion Range of Motion on Injury Prevention and Sport Performance

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

The purpose of this review of literature is to examine the importance of increasing ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ADROM) for safety and performance in athletes. This review examines studies that demonstrate common static stretching times for increasing ADROM are ineffective and can even decrease athletic performance. Due to the fact that static stretching has no effect on ADROM, athletes with limited ADROM are left vulnerable to injury. It was found that limited ADROM can be a direct cause of patellofemoral pain. Additionally, limited ADROM was found to place the knee in vulnerable positions during a squat that could increase chance of injury. Many strength coaches have tried to correct this problem in training with Olympic weightlifting shoes. While Olympic weightlifting shoes can compensate for limited ADROM by elevating the heel and therefore decreasing risk of injury in training, these shoes are not worn in competition and consequently leave an athlete vulnerable to injury. A new method of increasing ADROM, floss bands, have been shown to significantly increase ankle ADROM and even jump height in athletes. Continued research into floss bands and new techniques such as body tempering devices should be investigated as new soft tissue mobilization and joint range of motion tools.