Event Title

Consistency is Kief: Problematic Discrepancies in Marijuana Policy, the Bible Belt Says NO to Drugs

Poster Number

071

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Political Science

Honors Thesis Committee

Jennifer Disney, Ph.D.; Adolpphus Belk, Ph.D.; and Christopher Van Aller, Ph.D

Location

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

Start Date

12-4-2019 2:15 PM

End Date

April 2019

Description

The stigmatization of marijuana consumption continues to run rampant in society, especially in minority communities. Inconsistencies in drug policy between various regions in the United States create divisive attitudes toward marijuana consumers. These wild policy variations add to further exaggerate the assumed health threat of cannabis use and overemphasize the criminal threat of marijuana through sale and distribution. The consequences of these policy variations contribute to mass incarceration, the overuse of state budgets, and few solutions to the crime issue. This paper will examine the benefits of education about recreational marijuana use, create an open dialogue about marijuana approval or disapproval without stigmatization and stereotyping, and offer solutions to the aforementioned policy consequences.

Course Assignment

PLSC 490H – Belk and Van Aller

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Apr 12th, 2:15 PM Apr 12th, 4:15 PM

Consistency is Kief: Problematic Discrepancies in Marijuana Policy, the Bible Belt Says NO to Drugs

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

The stigmatization of marijuana consumption continues to run rampant in society, especially in minority communities. Inconsistencies in drug policy between various regions in the United States create divisive attitudes toward marijuana consumers. These wild policy variations add to further exaggerate the assumed health threat of cannabis use and overemphasize the criminal threat of marijuana through sale and distribution. The consequences of these policy variations contribute to mass incarceration, the overuse of state budgets, and few solutions to the crime issue. This paper will examine the benefits of education about recreational marijuana use, create an open dialogue about marijuana approval or disapproval without stigmatization and stereotyping, and offer solutions to the aforementioned policy consequences.