Event Title

Optimization of the FRESH Method of 3D Bioprinting

Poster Number

029

Faculty Mentor

Matthew Stern, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Biology

Location

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

Start Date

12-4-2019 2:15 PM

End Date

April 2019

Description

Advancements in 3D printing and 3D bioprinting are enabling exciting new types of biomedical research and development. These technologies hold great promise for the manufacturing of highly customizable bioengineered products. We introduced the freeform reversible embedding of suspended hydrogels (FRESH) method of 3D bioprinting to our lab. The FRESH method relies on a gelatin slurry to temporarily support soft biomaterials until they can be crosslinked into a product capable of holding its own shape. We aimed to optimize production of the gelatin slurry to ensure that it would allow precise 3D bioprinting and support complex structures. Many variables in the two-day protocol required optimization; these included the timing of several steps, the temperature during key steps, and the speed of the blender blade. An optimal gelatin slurry can self-heal when a printing needle passes through it and is capable of supporting the bio-ink of interest until it can be crosslinked. We produced and used a sodium alginate bio-ink for testing in these experiments, and we qualitatively assessed each batch of gelatin slurry based on the criteria described above. After optimization of the slurry was completed, we built upon our knowledge of the 3D printing software Pronterface to use our newly acquired R3bel Mini bioprinter, which provides our lab with a second bioprinting system. The next step in our research is to consistently print using the FRESH method on both the R3bel Mini and the Allevi 2 bioprinters with multiple bio-inks and cell types.

Grant Support?

Supported by an SC INBRE grant from the National Institute for General Medical Sciences (NIH-NIGMS) and by grants from the Winthrop University Research Council

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Apr 12th, 2:15 PM Apr 12th, 4:15 PM

Optimization of the FRESH Method of 3D Bioprinting

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

Advancements in 3D printing and 3D bioprinting are enabling exciting new types of biomedical research and development. These technologies hold great promise for the manufacturing of highly customizable bioengineered products. We introduced the freeform reversible embedding of suspended hydrogels (FRESH) method of 3D bioprinting to our lab. The FRESH method relies on a gelatin slurry to temporarily support soft biomaterials until they can be crosslinked into a product capable of holding its own shape. We aimed to optimize production of the gelatin slurry to ensure that it would allow precise 3D bioprinting and support complex structures. Many variables in the two-day protocol required optimization; these included the timing of several steps, the temperature during key steps, and the speed of the blender blade. An optimal gelatin slurry can self-heal when a printing needle passes through it and is capable of supporting the bio-ink of interest until it can be crosslinked. We produced and used a sodium alginate bio-ink for testing in these experiments, and we qualitatively assessed each batch of gelatin slurry based on the criteria described above. After optimization of the slurry was completed, we built upon our knowledge of the 3D printing software Pronterface to use our newly acquired R3bel Mini bioprinter, which provides our lab with a second bioprinting system. The next step in our research is to consistently print using the FRESH method on both the R3bel Mini and the Allevi 2 bioprinters with multiple bio-inks and cell types.