Event Title

An Analysis of Perspectives on Conservation of Mammal Species Using a Biome-Level Approach

Poster Number

034

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Biology

Honors Thesis Committee

William Rogers, Ph.D.; Jennifer Schafer, Ph.D.; and Cynthia Tant, Ph.D.

Location

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

Start Date

12-4-2019 2:15 PM

End Date

April 2019

Description

Conservation of species and preservation of biodiversity are essential to life on Earth, but they have not always been emphasized by humans. As we continue to learn about the extensive damage done to the planet and its inhabitants by anthropogenic activities, we need to make conservation a priority. We recognize that there are natural fluctuations in environmental conditions that affect all living organisms. However, in addition to these natural changes, living organisms must contend with alterations that have been initiated or exacerbated by humans and their actions for centuries. This thesis aims to analyze research conducted on attitudes toward and perceptions of conservation by individuals from multiple regions around the world. While this approach could be used to analyze the effects of anthropogenic activities on any taxonomic category of organisms, this research focuses specifically on mammal species. I provide examples of mammal species in need of conservation efforts in three different biomes: African savanna, Asian and South American tropical rainforests, and marine waters in the Northern Hemisphere. My goal is to showcase the work being done by researchers and to direct individuals’ attention to conservation issues and their importance, while also encouraging people to support the conservation of mammals and the preservation of mammalian biodiversity.

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Apr 12th, 2:15 PM Apr 12th, 4:15 PM

An Analysis of Perspectives on Conservation of Mammal Species Using a Biome-Level Approach

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

Conservation of species and preservation of biodiversity are essential to life on Earth, but they have not always been emphasized by humans. As we continue to learn about the extensive damage done to the planet and its inhabitants by anthropogenic activities, we need to make conservation a priority. We recognize that there are natural fluctuations in environmental conditions that affect all living organisms. However, in addition to these natural changes, living organisms must contend with alterations that have been initiated or exacerbated by humans and their actions for centuries. This thesis aims to analyze research conducted on attitudes toward and perceptions of conservation by individuals from multiple regions around the world. While this approach could be used to analyze the effects of anthropogenic activities on any taxonomic category of organisms, this research focuses specifically on mammal species. I provide examples of mammal species in need of conservation efforts in three different biomes: African savanna, Asian and South American tropical rainforests, and marine waters in the Northern Hemisphere. My goal is to showcase the work being done by researchers and to direct individuals’ attention to conservation issues and their importance, while also encouraging people to support the conservation of mammals and the preservation of mammalian biodiversity.