Event Title

Interracial Dating on College Campuses: The Associations Between Race and Gender

Poster Number

021

Faculty Mentor

Tara J. Collins, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Psychology

Location

Rutledge Building

Start Date

12-4-2019 12:00 PM

End Date

May 2019

Description

We hypothesized that interracial couples would be perceived more negatively than same-race couples, that survey participants would find those of the same race more attractive, and that they would be more willing to date within their race. Our participants were from a convenience sample of 77 females, 22 males, and 3 non-binary individuals, most of whom attend Winthrop University. Most (64%) were between 18-24 years of age. We displayed a photo of an interracial couple and measured perceived levels of commitment, satisfaction, and physical intimacy. Next, we showed a same-race couple and measured the same variables. Then, we displayed a series of photos of similarly attractive people and asked the participants to rank their attraction to each photo along with their willingness to date the person photographed. Then, we asked for the background of the participants, including their numbers of interracial and same-race relationships. Finally, we asked a series of demographic questions measuring gender, race, and age. Statistical tests showed few significant differences between perceived attributes of photographed interracial versus same-race couples, with the exception that the woman in the interracial relationship was perceived to have a higher commitment level. Analyzing responses to photos of attractive people, we found that black participants were more attracted to and willing to date the black man than were white participants; white participants were more willing to date the white and Asian women than were black participants. In conclusion, perceptions of interracial relationships are not very different from those of same-race relationships, but people’s dating behavior and attraction are still primarily within race.

Course Assignment

PSYC 302 – Collins

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Apr 12th, 12:00 PM May 2nd, 2:00 PM

Interracial Dating on College Campuses: The Associations Between Race and Gender

Rutledge Building

We hypothesized that interracial couples would be perceived more negatively than same-race couples, that survey participants would find those of the same race more attractive, and that they would be more willing to date within their race. Our participants were from a convenience sample of 77 females, 22 males, and 3 non-binary individuals, most of whom attend Winthrop University. Most (64%) were between 18-24 years of age. We displayed a photo of an interracial couple and measured perceived levels of commitment, satisfaction, and physical intimacy. Next, we showed a same-race couple and measured the same variables. Then, we displayed a series of photos of similarly attractive people and asked the participants to rank their attraction to each photo along with their willingness to date the person photographed. Then, we asked for the background of the participants, including their numbers of interracial and same-race relationships. Finally, we asked a series of demographic questions measuring gender, race, and age. Statistical tests showed few significant differences between perceived attributes of photographed interracial versus same-race couples, with the exception that the woman in the interracial relationship was perceived to have a higher commitment level. Analyzing responses to photos of attractive people, we found that black participants were more attracted to and willing to date the black man than were white participants; white participants were more willing to date the white and Asian women than were black participants. In conclusion, perceptions of interracial relationships are not very different from those of same-race relationships, but people’s dating behavior and attraction are still primarily within race.