Event Title

Skeletal Muscle Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine with Decellularized Scaffolds and Adipose Derived Stem Cells

Poster Number

036

Faculty Mentor

Matthew Stern, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Biology

Location

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

Start Date

12-4-2019 2:15 PM

End Date

April 2019

Description

Regenerative medicine and tissue engineering could potentially provide a solution to help patients suffering from volumetric muscle loss and could also serve as a model for better understanding muscle regeneration. The process of regenerative medicine relies primarily on inducing a patient’s own cells to heal a tissue or organ, while the process of tissue engineering uses a biomaterial scaffold as a template for engineering viable and functional tissue. Our goal was to further optimize the production of porcine acellular muscle matrix (PAMM), a biomaterial derived from slices of pig skeletal muscle, for use in regenerative medicine and/or tissue engineering applications. We hypothesized that the hybridization of two previously implemented methods of decellularization that rely on 1) actin depolymerization and osmotic shock and 2) treatment with detergent would result in consistent and effective decellularization as measured by removal of cells/nuclei and retention of the structure of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Our results indicate that we were able to successfully decellularize 2-mm thick slices of porcine muscle, giving us an effective 33% increase in scaffold thickness from previous experiments. We were also able to control the orientation of ECM elements within our scaffolds. In addition, we showed that PAMM scaffolds can be successfully recellularized with human adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs). Our results show that it is possible to decellularize 2-mm thick porcine skeletal muscle slices and recellularize PAMM scaffolds using ADSCs. Future research will focus on inducing myogenesis within ADSC-seeded PAMM scaffolds through mechanical stimulation of the constructs.

Grant Support?

Supported by SC INBRE and INBRE Developmental Research Project grants from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIH-NIGMS)

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Apr 12th, 2:15 PM Apr 12th, 4:15 PM

Skeletal Muscle Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine with Decellularized Scaffolds and Adipose Derived Stem Cells

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

Regenerative medicine and tissue engineering could potentially provide a solution to help patients suffering from volumetric muscle loss and could also serve as a model for better understanding muscle regeneration. The process of regenerative medicine relies primarily on inducing a patient’s own cells to heal a tissue or organ, while the process of tissue engineering uses a biomaterial scaffold as a template for engineering viable and functional tissue. Our goal was to further optimize the production of porcine acellular muscle matrix (PAMM), a biomaterial derived from slices of pig skeletal muscle, for use in regenerative medicine and/or tissue engineering applications. We hypothesized that the hybridization of two previously implemented methods of decellularization that rely on 1) actin depolymerization and osmotic shock and 2) treatment with detergent would result in consistent and effective decellularization as measured by removal of cells/nuclei and retention of the structure of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Our results indicate that we were able to successfully decellularize 2-mm thick slices of porcine muscle, giving us an effective 33% increase in scaffold thickness from previous experiments. We were also able to control the orientation of ECM elements within our scaffolds. In addition, we showed that PAMM scaffolds can be successfully recellularized with human adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs). Our results show that it is possible to decellularize 2-mm thick porcine skeletal muscle slices and recellularize PAMM scaffolds using ADSCs. Future research will focus on inducing myogenesis within ADSC-seeded PAMM scaffolds through mechanical stimulation of the constructs.