Event Title

The Synthesis and Optimization of a Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor with Improved Hydrophilicity

Poster Number

040

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Chemistry, Physics, and Geology

Honors Thesis Committee

Christian Grattan, Ph.D.; Fatima Amir, Ph.D.; and Jason Hurlbert, Ph.D.

Location

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

Start Date

12-4-2019 2:15 PM

End Date

April 2019

Description

Cancer is a widespread disease that affects millions of people. There are many ways to treat cancer, including development of new cancer drugs by the targeting of a specific pathway. In this study, we target the ceramide/sphigosine-1-phosphate (S1P) pathway, which produces high levels of S1P in many types of cancer. We are developing a new drug to target the enzyme that makes S1P, sphingosine kinase (SK), by using the scaffold of a previously developed inhibitor, SKI-I. SKI-I has very low water solubility and therefore cannot be absorbed well in the body. To improve the use of SKI-I as a cancer drug, we are working on improving its solubility through modifications to the molecule. The modified compounds are then tested in an activity assay to asses their effectiveness. The most effective modifications will be combined into one improved compound.

Course Assignment

CHEM 551, 552H – Hanna

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 2:15 PM Apr 12th, 4:15 PM

The Synthesis and Optimization of a Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor with Improved Hydrophilicity

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

Cancer is a widespread disease that affects millions of people. There are many ways to treat cancer, including development of new cancer drugs by the targeting of a specific pathway. In this study, we target the ceramide/sphigosine-1-phosphate (S1P) pathway, which produces high levels of S1P in many types of cancer. We are developing a new drug to target the enzyme that makes S1P, sphingosine kinase (SK), by using the scaffold of a previously developed inhibitor, SKI-I. SKI-I has very low water solubility and therefore cannot be absorbed well in the body. To improve the use of SKI-I as a cancer drug, we are working on improving its solubility through modifications to the molecule. The modified compounds are then tested in an activity assay to asses their effectiveness. The most effective modifications will be combined into one improved compound.