Event Title

A Comprehensive Fitness Plan for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients

Poster Number

011

Faculty Mentor

Joni Boyd, Ph.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Physical Education, Sport, and Human Performance

Location

Rutledge Building

Start Date

12-4-2019 12:00 PM

End Date

April 2019

Description

The purpose of this literature review is to evaluate the benefits of exercise for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. OSA affects nearly two to four percent of the adult population. More specifically, it is found in populations that are obese, have Type 2 diabetes, congestive heart failure, and pulmonary hypertension. The most effective strategy for treating OSA thus far is weight loss. Weight loss in patients with OSA has been shown to improve sleep and quality of life, and to decrease reliance on other means to help treat OSA, such as continuous positive airway compress. Studies in this review conclude that exercise can help reduce daytime fatigue and can have the same positive effects that a 10% body weight loss can. Exercise can be used as an aid to both help treat OSA independently, as well as an aid in weight loss. The results from the research articles suggest that exercise should be considered an effective prescription, in addition to weight loss, to cure OSA. An effective exercise program includes aerobic activity five times a week for 30-60 minutes, in addition to resistance training two to three times a week.

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Apr 12th, 12:00 PM Apr 22nd, 2:00 PM

A Comprehensive Fitness Plan for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients

Rutledge Building

The purpose of this literature review is to evaluate the benefits of exercise for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. OSA affects nearly two to four percent of the adult population. More specifically, it is found in populations that are obese, have Type 2 diabetes, congestive heart failure, and pulmonary hypertension. The most effective strategy for treating OSA thus far is weight loss. Weight loss in patients with OSA has been shown to improve sleep and quality of life, and to decrease reliance on other means to help treat OSA, such as continuous positive airway compress. Studies in this review conclude that exercise can help reduce daytime fatigue and can have the same positive effects that a 10% body weight loss can. Exercise can be used as an aid to both help treat OSA independently, as well as an aid in weight loss. The results from the research articles suggest that exercise should be considered an effective prescription, in addition to weight loss, to cure OSA. An effective exercise program includes aerobic activity five times a week for 30-60 minutes, in addition to resistance training two to three times a week.