Event Title

Application of Assisted Jump Training Methodology on Improving Peak Vertical Jump Height: A Comprehensive Review

Poster Number

014

Faculty Mentor

Joni Boyd, Ph.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Physical Education, Sport, and Human Performance

Location

Rutledge Building

Start Date

12-4-2019 12:00 PM

End Date

April 2019

Description

Jump training has become an invaluable tool for strength coaches across all disciplines and sports as a means of increasing power and explosiveness in their athletes. This review is focused on assisted jump training (negative load jump training), particularly its methodology and technique, as a novel method of training that needs further exploration. Assisted jump training utilizes what is known as the overspeed concept, which allows athletes to increase their limb speed beyond their own maximal speed to ultimately increase power output. This approach has appeared in past literature for increasing sprint speed and can be translated into the vertical dimension to increase total velocity and jump height. The limited research that currently exists on assisted jump training has shown significant increases in counter-movement jump height and peak power output compared to normal jump training. These improvements suggest that assisted jump training is a new avenue to improve jump performance that is relatively unexplored. This review seeks to analyze current research and present the need for standardization of assisted jump training methodology as it relates to the variables of frequency, intensity, volume, and rest.

Course Assignment

PESH 381 – Jenny

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Apr 12th, 12:00 PM Apr 25th, 2:00 PM

Application of Assisted Jump Training Methodology on Improving Peak Vertical Jump Height: A Comprehensive Review

Rutledge Building

Jump training has become an invaluable tool for strength coaches across all disciplines and sports as a means of increasing power and explosiveness in their athletes. This review is focused on assisted jump training (negative load jump training), particularly its methodology and technique, as a novel method of training that needs further exploration. Assisted jump training utilizes what is known as the overspeed concept, which allows athletes to increase their limb speed beyond their own maximal speed to ultimately increase power output. This approach has appeared in past literature for increasing sprint speed and can be translated into the vertical dimension to increase total velocity and jump height. The limited research that currently exists on assisted jump training has shown significant increases in counter-movement jump height and peak power output compared to normal jump training. These improvements suggest that assisted jump training is a new avenue to improve jump performance that is relatively unexplored. This review seeks to analyze current research and present the need for standardization of assisted jump training methodology as it relates to the variables of frequency, intensity, volume, and rest.