Event Title

The Impact of Financial Strain and Academic Workload on Stress in College Students

Poster Number

089

Faculty Mentor

Tara J. Collins, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Psychology

Location

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

Start Date

12-4-2019 2:15 PM

End Date

April 2019

Description

In our current study, we looked at stress in college students, financial strain, and academic workload. Participants were 149 students from a small university in South Carolina. Data were collected in a convenience sample with an online questionnaire. We manipulated academic workload using high- and low-workload scenarios. We also manipulated financial strain using high- and low-strain scenarios that were given to the students randomly. After each scenario, we measured the amount of stress participants would feel if they were in that financial/academic situation, using the Situational Stress Scale of Edwards, Edwards and Lyvers (2015). We conducted an independent-samples t-test to examine the effect of course load on stress. There was a significant difference in the amount of stress between the high (M = 6.02) and low (M = 5.08) academic load conditions (t (130) = 4.22, p < 0.001). We also conducted an independent-samples t-test to examine the effect of financial strain on stress. There was a significant difference in the amount of stress between the high (M = 6.52) and low (M = 3.88) financial strain conditions (t (78.15) = 10.87, p < 0.001). The results show that students who have a larger course load are more stressed than students who have a smaller course load, and students who have higher financial strain are more stressed than students with low financial strain. Implications for future research on college students and stress are discussed.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Annual Meeting, Jacksonville, Florida, March 2019

Course Assignment

PSYC 302 – Collins

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 2:15 PM Apr 12th, 4:15 PM

The Impact of Financial Strain and Academic Workload on Stress in College Students

Richardson Ballroom – DiGiorgio Campus Center

In our current study, we looked at stress in college students, financial strain, and academic workload. Participants were 149 students from a small university in South Carolina. Data were collected in a convenience sample with an online questionnaire. We manipulated academic workload using high- and low-workload scenarios. We also manipulated financial strain using high- and low-strain scenarios that were given to the students randomly. After each scenario, we measured the amount of stress participants would feel if they were in that financial/academic situation, using the Situational Stress Scale of Edwards, Edwards and Lyvers (2015). We conducted an independent-samples t-test to examine the effect of course load on stress. There was a significant difference in the amount of stress between the high (M = 6.02) and low (M = 5.08) academic load conditions (t (130) = 4.22, p < 0.001). We also conducted an independent-samples t-test to examine the effect of financial strain on stress. There was a significant difference in the amount of stress between the high (M = 6.52) and low (M = 3.88) financial strain conditions (t (78.15) = 10.87, p < 0.001). The results show that students who have a larger course load are more stressed than students who have a smaller course load, and students who have higher financial strain are more stressed than students with low financial strain. Implications for future research on college students and stress are discussed.