Event Title

Communist Cuba, Hypermasculinity, and Feminism

Session Title

Feminism and Identity

Faculty Mentor

Jennifer Disney, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Political Science

Location

DIGS 220

Start Date

12-4-2019 1:00 PM

Description

This paper will examine the way Cuban culture influences and maintains traditional norms that affect Third-World women and Third-World feminisms, specifically looking at the Third-World communist country of the Republic of Cuba. Cuba has a communist political system, which affects every person in its society, men, and women. Women, historically, are responsible for unpaid work such as childcare and housework; this is not only a product of Cuba’s economic norms, but also a product of Cuban hypermasculinity and machista culture. Hypermasculinity is evident when looking at prominent public figures in Cuba such as Fidel Castro. Feminism’s influence in Cuba emerges from its Marxist-feminist struggle within communism. Many Cuban women are excelling outside of the home, but are still ultimately responsible for “women’s work” inside the home; thus, the double day continues. Unity Feminism is offered as a solution for incorporating both men and women of all intersections into the fight for equality for all.

Course Assignment

PLSC 510 – Disney

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 1:00 PM

Communist Cuba, Hypermasculinity, and Feminism

DIGS 220

This paper will examine the way Cuban culture influences and maintains traditional norms that affect Third-World women and Third-World feminisms, specifically looking at the Third-World communist country of the Republic of Cuba. Cuba has a communist political system, which affects every person in its society, men, and women. Women, historically, are responsible for unpaid work such as childcare and housework; this is not only a product of Cuba’s economic norms, but also a product of Cuban hypermasculinity and machista culture. Hypermasculinity is evident when looking at prominent public figures in Cuba such as Fidel Castro. Feminism’s influence in Cuba emerges from its Marxist-feminist struggle within communism. Many Cuban women are excelling outside of the home, but are still ultimately responsible for “women’s work” inside the home; thus, the double day continues. Unity Feminism is offered as a solution for incorporating both men and women of all intersections into the fight for equality for all.