Event Title

Analysis of Mentorship in a Structured Undergraduate Program

Session Title

Sport, Mentorship, and Development

Faculty Mentor

Darren Ritzer, Ph.D

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Psychology

Location

DIGS 221

Start Date

12-4-2019 1:45 PM

Description

We examined mentorship in a structured undergraduate program from the perspectives of the undergraduate protégés. We examined the mentorship-protégé interactions and protégé satisfaction levels. The structured program that was the focus of this study was the Ronald E. McNair Scholars program, a scholarship program that provides support and resources for first-generation, low-income, or underrepresented students in higher education. Through the program, undergraduates conduct research in order to increase their competitiveness for graduate studies. McNair Scholars across the United States are paired with mentors, faculty, or advanced graduate students, who guide them through this research experience. McNair Scholars were recruited nationally for this study. Thirteen current McNair Scholars completed a very extensive online questionnaire, which included published scales and open-ended response options to assess variables such as acceptance, challenge, coaching, counseling, friendship, psychosocial support, protection, exposure, role modeling, social support, career support, and satisfaction. The published scales included the following: Mentoring Functions Questionnaire, Mentoring Role Instrument, Satisfaction with Mentor Scale, and Mentoring Functions Scale. We found that protégés appreciate professional guidance from their mentors rather than social friendships. Undergraduate protégés are not looking to replace their parents, but instead seem to desire mentors who can help them prepare for their careers and transition to being young professionals. These findings are noteworthy because the McNair Scholars in our study selected their mentors; instead of seeking the most comfortable social relationships, the Scholars seem to have prioritized preparation for the future when picking a mentor.

Previously Presented/Performed?

SAEOPP McNair/SSS Scholars Research Conference, Atlanta, Georgia, June 2018; Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Annual Meeting, Jacksonville, Florida, March 2019

Grant Support?

Supported by a Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program grant from the U.S. Department of Education

Awards Won

1st Place, Social Science Oral Presentations, SAEOPP McNair/SSS Scholars Research Conference, June 2018

Comments

Ta'Niss Robinson is a McNair Scholar.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 1:45 PM

Analysis of Mentorship in a Structured Undergraduate Program

DIGS 221

We examined mentorship in a structured undergraduate program from the perspectives of the undergraduate protégés. We examined the mentorship-protégé interactions and protégé satisfaction levels. The structured program that was the focus of this study was the Ronald E. McNair Scholars program, a scholarship program that provides support and resources for first-generation, low-income, or underrepresented students in higher education. Through the program, undergraduates conduct research in order to increase their competitiveness for graduate studies. McNair Scholars across the United States are paired with mentors, faculty, or advanced graduate students, who guide them through this research experience. McNair Scholars were recruited nationally for this study. Thirteen current McNair Scholars completed a very extensive online questionnaire, which included published scales and open-ended response options to assess variables such as acceptance, challenge, coaching, counseling, friendship, psychosocial support, protection, exposure, role modeling, social support, career support, and satisfaction. The published scales included the following: Mentoring Functions Questionnaire, Mentoring Role Instrument, Satisfaction with Mentor Scale, and Mentoring Functions Scale. We found that protégés appreciate professional guidance from their mentors rather than social friendships. Undergraduate protégés are not looking to replace their parents, but instead seem to desire mentors who can help them prepare for their careers and transition to being young professionals. These findings are noteworthy because the McNair Scholars in our study selected their mentors; instead of seeking the most comfortable social relationships, the Scholars seem to have prioritized preparation for the future when picking a mentor.