Event Title

Three-Dimensional Printing in Life Science Education

Session Title

Education across Disciplines

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Biology

Honors Thesis Committee

Matthew Stern, Ph.D.; Kathryn Kohl, Ph.D.; and Jennifer Schafer, Ph.D.

Location

WEST 214

Start Date

12-4-2019 1:45 PM

Description

This project examines why three-dimensional (3D) printing is an excellent resource for both students and educators in the life sciences. Both the completion of the 3D printing workflow and the use of 3D printed objects in the classroom and/or lab can foster an improved educational experience and deeper understanding of life science concepts. By incorporating the 3D printing process into the curriculum, life science graduates can be better prepared for the technological skills demanded by employers. The use of 3D printing by educators also allows for the creation of customized classroom resources and can be a more cost-effective alternative to purchasing the supplemental materials and models that are commonly used in life science courses. In theory, the same types of biological models printed for life science education could also be used for patient education in fields like genetic counseling and oncology, where it is necessary to communicate complex biological concepts. Here, I present a novel lesson plan that follows the create-design-implement-operate (CDIO) framework for the process of 3D printing. I also discuss how 3D printed objects can be used as “hooks” on which students can base their understanding of complex concepts and the potential to use 3D printed objects in patient education.

Grant Support?

Supported by grants from the Winthrop University Research Council

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Apr 12th, 1:45 PM

Three-Dimensional Printing in Life Science Education

WEST 214

This project examines why three-dimensional (3D) printing is an excellent resource for both students and educators in the life sciences. Both the completion of the 3D printing workflow and the use of 3D printed objects in the classroom and/or lab can foster an improved educational experience and deeper understanding of life science concepts. By incorporating the 3D printing process into the curriculum, life science graduates can be better prepared for the technological skills demanded by employers. The use of 3D printing by educators also allows for the creation of customized classroom resources and can be a more cost-effective alternative to purchasing the supplemental materials and models that are commonly used in life science courses. In theory, the same types of biological models printed for life science education could also be used for patient education in fields like genetic counseling and oncology, where it is necessary to communicate complex biological concepts. Here, I present a novel lesson plan that follows the create-design-implement-operate (CDIO) framework for the process of 3D printing. I also discuss how 3D printed objects can be used as “hooks” on which students can base their understanding of complex concepts and the potential to use 3D printed objects in patient education.