Event Title

The Impact of Feminism on Varying Groups in Society

Session Title

Feminism and Identity

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Political Science

Honors Thesis Committee

Jennifer Disney, Ph.D.; Michael Lipscomb, Ph.D.; and John Holder, Ph.D.

Location

DIGS 220

Start Date

12-4-2019 12:45 PM

Description

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how the feminist movement has helped and/or hurt various groups of individuals within a global context. Women in many countries throughout the world face oppression in one way or another. Feminist groups have formed in order to combat these forms of oppression. Feminism has developed in many countries and globally to achieve this goal. My research will be examining how the feminist movement should look at international, national, or transnational feminisms. It is important for women within each nation to develop their own sense of what feminism should hope to accomplish within that society. However, it is also important for women in a global context to develop a comradery under the term feminism. In particular, my research aims to explore the extent to which feminism should look at these multiple levels of the term. I conclude by asserting that feminism should not be an either-or study, but rather it should encompass both national, international, and transnational components.

Course Assignment

PLSC 490H – Disney and Lipscomb

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Apr 12th, 12:45 PM

The Impact of Feminism on Varying Groups in Society

DIGS 220

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how the feminist movement has helped and/or hurt various groups of individuals within a global context. Women in many countries throughout the world face oppression in one way or another. Feminist groups have formed in order to combat these forms of oppression. Feminism has developed in many countries and globally to achieve this goal. My research will be examining how the feminist movement should look at international, national, or transnational feminisms. It is important for women within each nation to develop their own sense of what feminism should hope to accomplish within that society. However, it is also important for women in a global context to develop a comradery under the term feminism. In particular, my research aims to explore the extent to which feminism should look at these multiple levels of the term. I conclude by asserting that feminism should not be an either-or study, but rather it should encompass both national, international, and transnational components.