Event Title

Understanding the Perceptions of Dry Needling in NCAA Division I Athletes

Session Title

Sport, Mentorship, and Development

Faculty Mentor

Joni Boyd, Ph.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Physical Education, Sport, and Human Performance

Location

DIGS 221

Start Date

12-4-2019 1:00 PM

Description

Dry needling is a pain management and recovery method that is becoming more popular despite the dearth of published literature on its effectiveness. The aim of this study was to examine the perceptions of dry needling for muscle pain management and/or recovery among NCAA Division I athletes. Seventy-seven NCAA Division I athletes completed a 15-item survey via e-mail. Participants who had experienced dry needling were asked to rate the perceptions of that experience. Those who had not experienced dry needling were asked to rate their perceptions and reasoning for non-exposure. The frequencies and descriptive perceptions of dry needling exposure or non-exposure were analyzed. The results indicated that 66% (n = 51) of participants did not have experience with dry needling, while 34% (n = 26) did have experience with dry needling. Those athletes not exposed to dry needling reported that they would rather use other treatments (26%); they were concerned with pain or bruising (13%); or they were not sure it would work for recovery (22%). Athletes who experienced dry needling reported that dry needling was effective and comfortable for efficient and speedy recovery (61%). They also reported that they would recommend that others use this recovery treatment (50%). In conclusion, for many athletes, dry needling is an effective treatment for muscle pain management or recovery. For other athletes, recovery treatments, such as massage therapy, electrical stimulation, and ultrasound are preferable. Future research could compare treatment protocols for pain management and/or recovery effectiveness.

Previously Presented/Performed?

SAEOPP McNair/SSS Scholars Research Conference, Atlanta, Georgia, June 2018; Southeast American College of Sports Medicine (SEACSM) Annual Meeting, Greenville, South Carolina, February 2019

Grant Support?

Supported by a Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program grant from the U.S. Department of Education

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Apr 12th, 1:00 PM

Understanding the Perceptions of Dry Needling in NCAA Division I Athletes

DIGS 221

Dry needling is a pain management and recovery method that is becoming more popular despite the dearth of published literature on its effectiveness. The aim of this study was to examine the perceptions of dry needling for muscle pain management and/or recovery among NCAA Division I athletes. Seventy-seven NCAA Division I athletes completed a 15-item survey via e-mail. Participants who had experienced dry needling were asked to rate the perceptions of that experience. Those who had not experienced dry needling were asked to rate their perceptions and reasoning for non-exposure. The frequencies and descriptive perceptions of dry needling exposure or non-exposure were analyzed. The results indicated that 66% (n = 51) of participants did not have experience with dry needling, while 34% (n = 26) did have experience with dry needling. Those athletes not exposed to dry needling reported that they would rather use other treatments (26%); they were concerned with pain or bruising (13%); or they were not sure it would work for recovery (22%). Athletes who experienced dry needling reported that dry needling was effective and comfortable for efficient and speedy recovery (61%). They also reported that they would recommend that others use this recovery treatment (50%). In conclusion, for many athletes, dry needling is an effective treatment for muscle pain management or recovery. For other athletes, recovery treatments, such as massage therapy, electrical stimulation, and ultrasound are preferable. Future research could compare treatment protocols for pain management and/or recovery effectiveness.