Event Title

Clocking In for the Long Shift

Session Title

Humanities and Fine Arts

Faculty Mentor

Dustin M. Hoffman, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of English

Location

DIGS 114

Start Date

12-4-2019 1:15 PM

Description

Enter a restaurant. Walk past the host stand. Ignore the proffered menu. Walk through the crowded wake of white linen shrouding dark tables. Bull towards the restroom. Do not stop to admire the gallery of good bites framed in white china. Pass beyond the pale. Crash through the door into the kitchen. Dodge the flying knives, the popping oil. Do not stop to shout insults with the dripping cooks. Go one further. Bang through the escape-hatch door. That is where the story happens. Out with the bloated dumpsters, the beach of cigarette butts, the sun that you swear is not the same sun from before. That is where you start clocking in for the long shift. This flash fiction piece asserts that the small moments of mundane life are important, even momentous. In an age when the literary audience is no longer comprised solely of the elite, the heroization of the prince, the epic hero, or the demigod is no longer congruous. Focusing on the extraordinary in the mundane, this story explores the beauty of the dish-washers, the nearly-homeless, and the invisible.

Previously Presented/Performed?

World of Food Interdisciplinary Conference, Winthrop University, February 2019

Course Assignment

WRIT 307 – Hoffman

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Apr 12th, 1:15 PM

Clocking In for the Long Shift

DIGS 114

Enter a restaurant. Walk past the host stand. Ignore the proffered menu. Walk through the crowded wake of white linen shrouding dark tables. Bull towards the restroom. Do not stop to admire the gallery of good bites framed in white china. Pass beyond the pale. Crash through the door into the kitchen. Dodge the flying knives, the popping oil. Do not stop to shout insults with the dripping cooks. Go one further. Bang through the escape-hatch door. That is where the story happens. Out with the bloated dumpsters, the beach of cigarette butts, the sun that you swear is not the same sun from before. That is where you start clocking in for the long shift. This flash fiction piece asserts that the small moments of mundane life are important, even momentous. In an age when the literary audience is no longer comprised solely of the elite, the heroization of the prince, the epic hero, or the demigod is no longer congruous. Focusing on the extraordinary in the mundane, this story explores the beauty of the dish-washers, the nearly-homeless, and the invisible.