Event Title

University to Work Transition and Career Development

Session Title

Sport, Mentorship, and Development

Faculty Mentor

Michael Sickels, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Sociology, Criminology, and Anthropology

Location

DIGS 221

Start Date

12-4-2019 2:00 PM

Description

For this project, we examined how Winthrop University and the resources it makes available to undergraduate students were sufficient in helping them feel prepared to transition from college to the workforce. As Iris Yob asserts, the shift from a liberal arts education to a career in the field of study has become an important transition for university education by “taking into account what a student should know, be able to do, and what values and attitudes should be nurtured.” To study this issue, we conducted four focus groups comprised of senior students at Winthrop. Drawing from majors across the university, we interviewed 4-6 students per focus group in order to draw a diverse sample of departments. The structure of the focus group allowed us to hear diverse perspectives and observe how students discuss college life with one another. Hosting focus groups generated enough discussion to understand the level of preparedness across the institution. By comparing the focus group data with additional data about career preparation gathered from Winthrop’s website, we determined the overall effectiveness of the university’s approach to helping undergraduates transition from college into the workforce. Our paper provides insight into Winthrop University’s career development program and addresses how well student feel the university meets their needs. It also contributes to the ongoing debate about the changing goals of undergraduate education in the United States.

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Apr 12th, 2:00 PM

University to Work Transition and Career Development

DIGS 221

For this project, we examined how Winthrop University and the resources it makes available to undergraduate students were sufficient in helping them feel prepared to transition from college to the workforce. As Iris Yob asserts, the shift from a liberal arts education to a career in the field of study has become an important transition for university education by “taking into account what a student should know, be able to do, and what values and attitudes should be nurtured.” To study this issue, we conducted four focus groups comprised of senior students at Winthrop. Drawing from majors across the university, we interviewed 4-6 students per focus group in order to draw a diverse sample of departments. The structure of the focus group allowed us to hear diverse perspectives and observe how students discuss college life with one another. Hosting focus groups generated enough discussion to understand the level of preparedness across the institution. By comparing the focus group data with additional data about career preparation gathered from Winthrop’s website, we determined the overall effectiveness of the university’s approach to helping undergraduates transition from college into the workforce. Our paper provides insight into Winthrop University’s career development program and addresses how well student feel the university meets their needs. It also contributes to the ongoing debate about the changing goals of undergraduate education in the United States.