Event Title

Differences in Depressive Symptoms by Sociodemographic Characteristics in Cancer Survivors Residing in Central Pennsylvania

Session Title

Cancer and Biomedical Research

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Physical Education, Sport, and Human Performance

Location

WEST 219

Start Date

12-4-2019 1:30 PM

Description

The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of depressive symptoms in cancer survivors residing in central Pennsylvania, a largely rural, medically underserved area, and to explore differences in depressive symptoms by sociodemographic characteristics. Cancer survivors were recruited to the Partnering to Prevent and Control Cancer (PPCC) study through the Pennsylvania State Cancer Registry, cancer support groups, churches, and other community organizations. Participants (N = 262) completed questionnaires assessing sociodemographic characteristics and completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale to assess depressive symptoms. One-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests were used to explore differences in CES-D scores by income, race, educational attainment, employment status, marital status, and cancer type. Overall, 19.1% of cancer survivors reported significantly elevated levels of depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms were statistically significantly different by annual household income (F(2,184) = 8.597, p = 0.000) and employment status (F(2,189) = 14.512, p = 0.000). Cancer survivors who reported an annual household income less than $40,000 (95% CI: 9.34, 15.94) and were unemployed (95% CI: 11.46, 23.28) reported significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that financial strain due to low income and unemployment negatively impact mental health in cancer survivors residing in medically underserved areas in Pennsylvania. Interventions seeking to promote psychological well-being in cancer survivors are needed and should be tailored to those of lower socioeconomic status in an effort to improve cancer survivorship and promote health equity in rural, medically underserved populations.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Penn State Summer Research Symposium, University Park, Pennsylvania, July 2018; Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS), Indianapolis, Indiana, November 2018

Grant Support?

Supported by the Tobacco CURE Program from the Pennsylvania Department of Health, and by the Summer Research Opportunities Program (SROP) at Penn State University

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Apr 12th, 1:30 PM

Differences in Depressive Symptoms by Sociodemographic Characteristics in Cancer Survivors Residing in Central Pennsylvania

WEST 219

The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of depressive symptoms in cancer survivors residing in central Pennsylvania, a largely rural, medically underserved area, and to explore differences in depressive symptoms by sociodemographic characteristics. Cancer survivors were recruited to the Partnering to Prevent and Control Cancer (PPCC) study through the Pennsylvania State Cancer Registry, cancer support groups, churches, and other community organizations. Participants (N = 262) completed questionnaires assessing sociodemographic characteristics and completed the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scale to assess depressive symptoms. One-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests were used to explore differences in CES-D scores by income, race, educational attainment, employment status, marital status, and cancer type. Overall, 19.1% of cancer survivors reported significantly elevated levels of depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms were statistically significantly different by annual household income (F(2,184) = 8.597, p = 0.000) and employment status (F(2,189) = 14.512, p = 0.000). Cancer survivors who reported an annual household income less than $40,000 (95% CI: 9.34, 15.94) and were unemployed (95% CI: 11.46, 23.28) reported significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that financial strain due to low income and unemployment negatively impact mental health in cancer survivors residing in medically underserved areas in Pennsylvania. Interventions seeking to promote psychological well-being in cancer survivors are needed and should be tailored to those of lower socioeconomic status in an effort to improve cancer survivorship and promote health equity in rural, medically underserved populations.