Event Title

The Legacy of Redlining: Patterns of Contemporary Housing Discrimination

Session Title

Discrimination

Faculty Mentor

Michael Lipscomb, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Political Science

Location

DIGS 220

Start Date

12-4-2019 2:45 PM

Description

Discrimination in the real estate market has been present throughout history. One of the most notable forms of real estate discrimination is the historical practice of redlining. Redlining was a practice used in the 1930s to determine where lenders would loan money for home purchases. Any areas that were within the redlines were deemed to be high-risk areas they would not lend to, creating a pocket of real estate with lower value. Not all the areas of redlining were based on income; some were focused on minority population. The use of redlining has had a lasting effect on the shape and structure of all major cities. It was not until the fair housing act of 1968 that redlining was outlawed. Since then, many programs have been put into practice to create safe and affordable housing. Though many initiatives have been taken to prevent modern discrimination or segregation, minorities still struggle to create social and economic change in these areas that were previously affected by the practice of redlining. Studies have shown that, even eighty years later, these same redlined districts are still worth less in value and underdeveloped compared to the preferred lending areas, some undervalued by 10 times the amount found in those preferred areas. Many areas have further segregated by creating school district zones along these redlined districts, limiting the amount of integration between races.

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Apr 12th, 2:45 PM

The Legacy of Redlining: Patterns of Contemporary Housing Discrimination

DIGS 220

Discrimination in the real estate market has been present throughout history. One of the most notable forms of real estate discrimination is the historical practice of redlining. Redlining was a practice used in the 1930s to determine where lenders would loan money for home purchases. Any areas that were within the redlines were deemed to be high-risk areas they would not lend to, creating a pocket of real estate with lower value. Not all the areas of redlining were based on income; some were focused on minority population. The use of redlining has had a lasting effect on the shape and structure of all major cities. It was not until the fair housing act of 1968 that redlining was outlawed. Since then, many programs have been put into practice to create safe and affordable housing. Though many initiatives have been taken to prevent modern discrimination or segregation, minorities still struggle to create social and economic change in these areas that were previously affected by the practice of redlining. Studies have shown that, even eighty years later, these same redlined districts are still worth less in value and underdeveloped compared to the preferred lending areas, some undervalued by 10 times the amount found in those preferred areas. Many areas have further segregated by creating school district zones along these redlined districts, limiting the amount of integration between races.