Event Title

Cognitive Training as a Sharpening Tool for Athletic Performance

Session Title

Sport, Mentorship, and Development

Faculty Mentor

Joni Boyd, Ph.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Physical Education, Sport, and Human Performance

Location

DIGS 221

Start Date

12-4-2019 1:15 PM

Description

The purpose of this review is to assess the plausibility of utilizing cognitive training as part of athlete training regimens. The physical aspect of sport is the most often thought-of element pertaining to athletics. How fast? How strong? How high? These questions seem to be the most significant topics of discussion in terms of sport. This is because the physical aspect is typically associated with athletic prowess. However, a key element that is often not mentioned enough in sport is cognition. Sports demand a multitude of different cognitive functions in order for the physical training to be fully manifested. A soccer player who is a great passer must assess the field and find the options quickly, highlighting the role of cognition. Studies examining the impact of cognitive training on different populations, including elderly with and without degenerative brain disease, adults, and children, have all noted significant increases in cognition as a result of congnitive training. The findings in these populations all signify that cognitive training is indeed a plausible method for increasing mental acuity. In terms of athletics, these findings may provide promising new ways of advancing sports training. Mental exercises may be implemented and designed into training programs to maximize both physical and mental outputs of athletes. As a result, athletes may be able to get open quicker, analyze the field more efficiently, and significantly improve their reaction speeds and timing.

Course Assignment

PESH 381 – Boyd

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Apr 12th, 1:15 PM

Cognitive Training as a Sharpening Tool for Athletic Performance

DIGS 221

The purpose of this review is to assess the plausibility of utilizing cognitive training as part of athlete training regimens. The physical aspect of sport is the most often thought-of element pertaining to athletics. How fast? How strong? How high? These questions seem to be the most significant topics of discussion in terms of sport. This is because the physical aspect is typically associated with athletic prowess. However, a key element that is often not mentioned enough in sport is cognition. Sports demand a multitude of different cognitive functions in order for the physical training to be fully manifested. A soccer player who is a great passer must assess the field and find the options quickly, highlighting the role of cognition. Studies examining the impact of cognitive training on different populations, including elderly with and without degenerative brain disease, adults, and children, have all noted significant increases in cognition as a result of congnitive training. The findings in these populations all signify that cognitive training is indeed a plausible method for increasing mental acuity. In terms of athletics, these findings may provide promising new ways of advancing sports training. Mental exercises may be implemented and designed into training programs to maximize both physical and mental outputs of athletes. As a result, athletes may be able to get open quicker, analyze the field more efficiently, and significantly improve their reaction speeds and timing.