Event Title

Relationships among Social Support, Help Seeking, and Mental Health Symptoms

Poster Number

099

Faculty Mentor

Sarah Reiland, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Psychology

Location

Richardson Ball Room (DIGS)

Start Date

20-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 4:15 PM

Description

Social support can be measured according to whether people believe they have support available if they need it (i.e., perceived support), or it can be measured by supportive behaviors people report receiving in a certain time period (i.e., received support). Perceived support has been consistently linked to better health and fewer depression and PTSD symptoms. Additionally, people who are more willing to seek help show fewer symptoms of PTSD and depression, and also report higher perceived support. This study’s aim was to determine if PTSD and depression symptoms are inversely related to willingness to seek help and perceived social support in college students. Further, this study aimed to see which sources of social support are most important for college students. The sample for this study was comprised of 136 college students, 120 women and 16 men. The participants completed an online survey comprised of multiple assessments. Our results showed that there was no significant relationship between received support and PTSD or depression symptoms. People with greater symptoms of both PTSD and depression reported less willingness to seek help and lower levels of perceived support. Our results also showed that higher levels of symptoms were positively correlated with perceived support from significant others, whereas higher symptoms were negatively correlated with perceived support from family and friends. This study shows that enhancing perceived social support for individuals with PTSD and depression symptoms, particularly support from family and friends, could help with treatment.

Course Assignment

PSYC 471 – Reiland

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 2:15 PM Apr 20th, 4:15 PM

Relationships among Social Support, Help Seeking, and Mental Health Symptoms

Richardson Ball Room (DIGS)

Social support can be measured according to whether people believe they have support available if they need it (i.e., perceived support), or it can be measured by supportive behaviors people report receiving in a certain time period (i.e., received support). Perceived support has been consistently linked to better health and fewer depression and PTSD symptoms. Additionally, people who are more willing to seek help show fewer symptoms of PTSD and depression, and also report higher perceived support. This study’s aim was to determine if PTSD and depression symptoms are inversely related to willingness to seek help and perceived social support in college students. Further, this study aimed to see which sources of social support are most important for college students. The sample for this study was comprised of 136 college students, 120 women and 16 men. The participants completed an online survey comprised of multiple assessments. Our results showed that there was no significant relationship between received support and PTSD or depression symptoms. People with greater symptoms of both PTSD and depression reported less willingness to seek help and lower levels of perceived support. Our results also showed that higher levels of symptoms were positively correlated with perceived support from significant others, whereas higher symptoms were negatively correlated with perceived support from family and friends. This study shows that enhancing perceived social support for individuals with PTSD and depression symptoms, particularly support from family and friends, could help with treatment.