Event Title

Relationships among Personality, Mental Health Symptoms, and Social Support

Poster Number

098

Faculty Mentor

Sarah Reiland, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Psychology

Location

Richardson Ball Room (DIGS)

Start Date

20-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 4:15 PM

Description

Social support is often considered to be a protective factor that is associated with fewer depressive and anxiety symptoms, but studies rarely examine factors that may predict self-reported levels of social support. It is possible that personality (neuroticism) and self-esteem affect perceptions of support, and it is also possible that mental health symptoms that are associated with avoidance and social withdrawal could contribute to perceptions of low support in individuals with greater depression and PTSD symptoms. The purpose of this study is to examine what factors are connected to perceived and received social support in college students. At a southeastern university, 136 students completed surveys assessing PTSD symptoms, depression, self-esteem, and personality factors such as neuroticism. Results showed that social support had positive relationships with self-esteem, optimism, and neuroticism and a negative relationship with PTSD, thus supporting the hypothesis. Although social support may be protective, it is also possible that mental health symptoms and personality play a large role in perception of support. For treatment of those who have mental health symptoms, increasing perception of support could be just as important as increasing received support. Longitudinal studies are needed to further explore factors that predict perceptions of social support.

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Apr 20th, 2:15 PM Apr 20th, 4:15 PM

Relationships among Personality, Mental Health Symptoms, and Social Support

Richardson Ball Room (DIGS)

Social support is often considered to be a protective factor that is associated with fewer depressive and anxiety symptoms, but studies rarely examine factors that may predict self-reported levels of social support. It is possible that personality (neuroticism) and self-esteem affect perceptions of support, and it is also possible that mental health symptoms that are associated with avoidance and social withdrawal could contribute to perceptions of low support in individuals with greater depression and PTSD symptoms. The purpose of this study is to examine what factors are connected to perceived and received social support in college students. At a southeastern university, 136 students completed surveys assessing PTSD symptoms, depression, self-esteem, and personality factors such as neuroticism. Results showed that social support had positive relationships with self-esteem, optimism, and neuroticism and a negative relationship with PTSD, thus supporting the hypothesis. Although social support may be protective, it is also possible that mental health symptoms and personality play a large role in perception of support. For treatment of those who have mental health symptoms, increasing perception of support could be just as important as increasing received support. Longitudinal studies are needed to further explore factors that predict perceptions of social support.