Event Title

The Varied Relationships between Personality and Different Aspects of Social Media Use

Poster Number

093

Faculty Mentor

Matthew Hayes, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Location

Richardson Ballroom

Start Date

20-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 4:15 PM

Description

Previous research on the relationship between personality traits and social media use generally treat social media as a single entity, ignoring the diverse functions offered by these sites which may vary in their appeal to different personality types. For example, Amichai-Hamburger and Ben-Artzi (2002) found that people with high levels of neuroticism, extraversion, and openness were positively related with using instant messages and social media networking. However, they also found that interactions through online applications such as chat rooms differ from in-person interactions due to the lack of physical appearance and proximity. This suggests that personality may impact use of specific features of social media; for example, introverted people may use chat features to assuage their actual anxiety. However, they neglected other functions of social media – such as more public posting, photo sharing, and group messaging, – which may exhibit different relationships with personality factors. Extending previous work, the present study looked at a specific type of social media (Facebook) and examined the relationship between three separate aspects of Facebook use (attitudes, functions, and sociability) and Big 5 personality traits. We hypothesized that people with high level of extraversion and neuroticism would have more positive attitudes toward Facebook, visit it more frequently and use more of its features. The present study demonstrated that people’s attitudes towards Facebook, which features they use, and how frequently they use Facebook differentially relate to personality traits, suggesting that different aspects of social media may attract different personality traits.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Annual Meeting, Charleston, South Carolina, March 2018

Course Assignment

PSYC 302 – Hayes

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Apr 20th, 2:15 PM Apr 20th, 4:15 PM

The Varied Relationships between Personality and Different Aspects of Social Media Use

Richardson Ballroom

Previous research on the relationship between personality traits and social media use generally treat social media as a single entity, ignoring the diverse functions offered by these sites which may vary in their appeal to different personality types. For example, Amichai-Hamburger and Ben-Artzi (2002) found that people with high levels of neuroticism, extraversion, and openness were positively related with using instant messages and social media networking. However, they also found that interactions through online applications such as chat rooms differ from in-person interactions due to the lack of physical appearance and proximity. This suggests that personality may impact use of specific features of social media; for example, introverted people may use chat features to assuage their actual anxiety. However, they neglected other functions of social media – such as more public posting, photo sharing, and group messaging, – which may exhibit different relationships with personality factors. Extending previous work, the present study looked at a specific type of social media (Facebook) and examined the relationship between three separate aspects of Facebook use (attitudes, functions, and sociability) and Big 5 personality traits. We hypothesized that people with high level of extraversion and neuroticism would have more positive attitudes toward Facebook, visit it more frequently and use more of its features. The present study demonstrated that people’s attitudes towards Facebook, which features they use, and how frequently they use Facebook differentially relate to personality traits, suggesting that different aspects of social media may attract different personality traits.