Event Title

Young Adults’ College Experiences, Work Experiences, and Career Expectations

Poster Number

092

Faculty Mentor

Merry Sleigh, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Location

Richardson Ballroom

Start Date

20-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 4:15 PM

Description

This study focused on past work experience, college experience, career expectations, and stress. Participants were 93 college students, with a mean age of 19.88 (SD = 1.61). Participants completed a 66-question survey that measured job experience, college involvement, knowledge of psychology careers, job satisfaction, and stress. Results revealed that the more involved students were in college, the higher their overall stress level, r(93) = 0.21, p = 0.04, the higher their GPA, r(91) = 0.28, p = 0.008, and the older their age, r(93) = 0.33, p = 0.001. The average score for the knowledge test was 5.1 (SD = 1.16) on a 7-point scale. Compared to men, women were more likely to report that they would be self-employed or running their own business. Men were more likely to say they would work for an employer. People who knew what they would be doing in the future had higher GPAs, t(89) = 3.86, p < 0.001. We examined the occupations participants would pursue with and without constraints. In general, the no-constraint occupations were more likely to be unattainable for this age group, such as becoming an astronaut, or unrealistic, such as being a bartender in Las Vegas. These findings suggest that college students do not have clear and consistent expectations for their future, regardless of their work and college experiences.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Annual Meeting, Charleston, South Carolina, March 2018

Course Assignment

PSYC 302 – Sleigh

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Apr 20th, 2:15 PM Apr 20th, 4:15 PM

Young Adults’ College Experiences, Work Experiences, and Career Expectations

Richardson Ballroom

This study focused on past work experience, college experience, career expectations, and stress. Participants were 93 college students, with a mean age of 19.88 (SD = 1.61). Participants completed a 66-question survey that measured job experience, college involvement, knowledge of psychology careers, job satisfaction, and stress. Results revealed that the more involved students were in college, the higher their overall stress level, r(93) = 0.21, p = 0.04, the higher their GPA, r(91) = 0.28, p = 0.008, and the older their age, r(93) = 0.33, p = 0.001. The average score for the knowledge test was 5.1 (SD = 1.16) on a 7-point scale. Compared to men, women were more likely to report that they would be self-employed or running their own business. Men were more likely to say they would work for an employer. People who knew what they would be doing in the future had higher GPAs, t(89) = 3.86, p < 0.001. We examined the occupations participants would pursue with and without constraints. In general, the no-constraint occupations were more likely to be unattainable for this age group, such as becoming an astronaut, or unrealistic, such as being a bartender in Las Vegas. These findings suggest that college students do not have clear and consistent expectations for their future, regardless of their work and college experiences.