Event Title

Self-Perceptions of Adults with and without the Diagnosis of ADHD/ADD

Poster Number

090

Faculty Mentor

Merry Sleigh, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Psychology

Location

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

Start Date

20-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 4:15 PM

Description

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and attention deficit disorder (ADD) have been widely studied. Previous research on ADHD/ADD focused primarily on diagnosed children’s self-perceptions, whereas little has examined diagnosed adults’ self-perceptions. Thus, our study compared the academic self-perceptions of young adults currently diagnosed or never diagnosed with ADHD/ADD. Participants were 82 young adults with a mean age of 21.07 (SD = 1.79). Half of the participants had a diagnosis of ADHD/ADD, and half had never been diagnosed. Participants responded to scales that examined their attitudes toward and knowledge about ADHD/ADD, we well as their academic and social experiences. Results revealed that the young adults in our study held very similar perceptions and attitudes about ADD/ADHD. There was a slight tendency for Caucasians and women to more strongly perceive it as a true disorder. Diagnosed individuals felt that they struggled more academically than their non-diagnosed peers did, which matches data collected from diagnosed children. However, we found college GPA did not support this perception, whereas, in children, performance was lower for diagnosed individuals. This dichotomy suggests that by the time diagnosed individuals reach adulthood, they may have better strategies to overcome academic challenges presented by their disorder. This study supplements what is known about ADD/ADHD by providing needed insight into how this commonly diagnosed disorder impacts the adult population.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Annual Meeting, Charleston, South Carolina, March 2018

Course Assignment

PSYC 302 – Sleigh

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Apr 20th, 2:15 PM Apr 20th, 4:15 PM

Self-Perceptions of Adults with and without the Diagnosis of ADHD/ADD

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and attention deficit disorder (ADD) have been widely studied. Previous research on ADHD/ADD focused primarily on diagnosed children’s self-perceptions, whereas little has examined diagnosed adults’ self-perceptions. Thus, our study compared the academic self-perceptions of young adults currently diagnosed or never diagnosed with ADHD/ADD. Participants were 82 young adults with a mean age of 21.07 (SD = 1.79). Half of the participants had a diagnosis of ADHD/ADD, and half had never been diagnosed. Participants responded to scales that examined their attitudes toward and knowledge about ADHD/ADD, we well as their academic and social experiences. Results revealed that the young adults in our study held very similar perceptions and attitudes about ADD/ADHD. There was a slight tendency for Caucasians and women to more strongly perceive it as a true disorder. Diagnosed individuals felt that they struggled more academically than their non-diagnosed peers did, which matches data collected from diagnosed children. However, we found college GPA did not support this perception, whereas, in children, performance was lower for diagnosed individuals. This dichotomy suggests that by the time diagnosed individuals reach adulthood, they may have better strategies to overcome academic challenges presented by their disorder. This study supplements what is known about ADD/ADHD by providing needed insight into how this commonly diagnosed disorder impacts the adult population.