Event Title

Factors Predicting Young Adults' Support of the Black Lives Matter Movement

Poster Number

089

Faculty Mentor

Merry Sleigh, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Psychology

Location

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

Start Date

20-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 4:15 PM

Description

The communicative power of social media has led to an increase of young adults’ participation in social movements such as Black Lives Matter (BLM). We examined factors that predicted adults’ willingness to support BLM and other social movements. Participants were 82 young adults with a mean age of 20.5 (SD = 1.56). Fifty eight percent were Caucasian, 24% were African American, and the remainder reported other minority ethnicities. We assessed adherence to BLM ideology, along with active participation with and social media support for the BLM movement. Then, participants responded to items assessing tendencies for entitlement and impression management. Immediately afterward we provided the entitlement scale again but asked participants to answer as if they were a member of a “different race than their own.” We found that support of BLM was highest among those with liberal beliefs and African American people. Race and political beliefs emerged as more influential variables than gender and religious beliefs. Individuals who supported BLM did not show a high sense of entitlement; however, they perceived entitlement in racial groups other than their own. This result might indicate that support for minority movements is partially a belief in and resistance to entitled social groups. People did not seem to support BLM as an impression management strategy, but those who supported BLM also indicated that they are willing to support almost any social movement, suggesting a generalized dissatisfaction with the status quo.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Annual Meeting, Charleston, South Carolina, March 2018

Awards Won

Winner, Psi Chi Regional Research Award, SEPA Annual Meeting, March 2018

Course Assignment

PSYC 302 – Sleigh

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 2:15 PM Apr 20th, 4:15 PM

Factors Predicting Young Adults' Support of the Black Lives Matter Movement

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

The communicative power of social media has led to an increase of young adults’ participation in social movements such as Black Lives Matter (BLM). We examined factors that predicted adults’ willingness to support BLM and other social movements. Participants were 82 young adults with a mean age of 20.5 (SD = 1.56). Fifty eight percent were Caucasian, 24% were African American, and the remainder reported other minority ethnicities. We assessed adherence to BLM ideology, along with active participation with and social media support for the BLM movement. Then, participants responded to items assessing tendencies for entitlement and impression management. Immediately afterward we provided the entitlement scale again but asked participants to answer as if they were a member of a “different race than their own.” We found that support of BLM was highest among those with liberal beliefs and African American people. Race and political beliefs emerged as more influential variables than gender and religious beliefs. Individuals who supported BLM did not show a high sense of entitlement; however, they perceived entitlement in racial groups other than their own. This result might indicate that support for minority movements is partially a belief in and resistance to entitled social groups. People did not seem to support BLM as an impression management strategy, but those who supported BLM also indicated that they are willing to support almost any social movement, suggesting a generalized dissatisfaction with the status quo.