Event Title

The Struggle for Resilience: The Correlation Between Childhood Experiences and Coping in College Students

Poster Number

086

Faculty Mentor

Tara J. Collins, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Psychology

Location

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

Start Date

20-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 4:15 PM

Description

The current study seeks to understand the relationship coping skills and resilience in children based on whether or not they experienced parental relationship strain, and whether the coping behavior continues on into college years. We hypothesized that individuals who had experienced parental relationship strain would establish strong coping mechanisms in response to that stressor and would become more resilient to later life stressors. Data were collected through a convenience sample of students from Winthrop University that included 12 men and 72 women. Their ages ranged from 18 to 25, and 59.52% of participants’ parents were still married. Through an online survey, we assessed the different ways in which people cope with stress, perceived stress in one’s life, interparental conflict, and resilience factors. Based on our results, it can be said that parental conflict affects childhood experiences and coping behavior, but only in certain ways. For example, it can be concluded that children who experience less resolution in parental arguments may learn better to cope with and accept situations out of their control.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Annual Meeting, Charleston, South Carolina, March 2018

Course Assignment

(PSYC 302 – Collins

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Apr 20th, 2:15 PM Apr 20th, 4:15 PM

The Struggle for Resilience: The Correlation Between Childhood Experiences and Coping in College Students

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

The current study seeks to understand the relationship coping skills and resilience in children based on whether or not they experienced parental relationship strain, and whether the coping behavior continues on into college years. We hypothesized that individuals who had experienced parental relationship strain would establish strong coping mechanisms in response to that stressor and would become more resilient to later life stressors. Data were collected through a convenience sample of students from Winthrop University that included 12 men and 72 women. Their ages ranged from 18 to 25, and 59.52% of participants’ parents were still married. Through an online survey, we assessed the different ways in which people cope with stress, perceived stress in one’s life, interparental conflict, and resilience factors. Based on our results, it can be said that parental conflict affects childhood experiences and coping behavior, but only in certain ways. For example, it can be concluded that children who experience less resolution in parental arguments may learn better to cope with and accept situations out of their control.