Event Title

The Continuing International Relations and Foreign Policy Implications Resulting from the Spanish American War

Poster Number

084

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Political Science

Honors Thesis Committee

Honors Thesis Committee: Jennifer Disney, Ph.D.; John Holder, Ph.D.; and Chris Van Aller, Ph.D.

Location

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

Start Date

20-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 4:15 PM

Description

December 10, 1898, was a highly significant day in world history. The date marks the signing of the Treaty of Paris, an agreement between Spain and The United States of America that ended The Spanish American War. A number of important territories exchanged hands at the end of the war as a result of the agreements reached in the Treaty of Paris, including Puerto Rico, Guam, Cuba, Hawaii, and the Philippines. With the Spanish American War resulting in such a large shakeup of world power, the following question might be asked: Are the results of the Spanish American War still affecting international relations today, and what effect does this have on United States foreign policy? In this paper, I argue that the provisions of the Treaty of Paris are still very much at play in international relations today and I demonstrate how aspects of United States foreign policy are still focused on the territories involved.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Fourth Annual Showcase of Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavors (SOURCE), Winthrop University, April 2018

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Apr 20th, 2:15 PM Apr 20th, 4:15 PM

The Continuing International Relations and Foreign Policy Implications Resulting from the Spanish American War

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

December 10, 1898, was a highly significant day in world history. The date marks the signing of the Treaty of Paris, an agreement between Spain and The United States of America that ended The Spanish American War. A number of important territories exchanged hands at the end of the war as a result of the agreements reached in the Treaty of Paris, including Puerto Rico, Guam, Cuba, Hawaii, and the Philippines. With the Spanish American War resulting in such a large shakeup of world power, the following question might be asked: Are the results of the Spanish American War still affecting international relations today, and what effect does this have on United States foreign policy? In this paper, I argue that the provisions of the Treaty of Paris are still very much at play in international relations today and I demonstrate how aspects of United States foreign policy are still focused on the territories involved.