Event Title

Exercise Programming for Pediatric Cancer Patients

Poster Number

082

Faculty Mentor

Janet Wojcik, Ph.D

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Physical Education, Sport, and Human Performance

Location

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

Start Date

20-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 4:15 PM

Description

Pediatric cancer occurs at a rate of 17 per 100,000 children, from infancy to adolescence. The most common pediatric cancers are acute lymphoblastic leukemia, nervous system and brain tumors, and Hodgkin lymphoma. These children go through a great deal to continue their lives as they were before they were diagnosed, so keeping a regular exercise and play schedule is crucial for them. Physical activity at least 60 minutes per day is recommended for youths by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Trained exercise physiologists and occupational therapists can lead exercise to benefit physical and mental health. Although research is limited, studies have found exercise in pediatric cancer generally to be safe. If youths cannot perform 60 minutes at one time, they should exercise in short bouts of 10 minutes and gradually increase duration. Their symptoms and fatigue will limit them, and they may need to avoid exercise on most chemotherapy days, except for light stretching. They can participate in walking or cycling, play games, dance, and use cardio equipment. They will require much slower progression in their intensity or duration of exercise. Resistance training can occur 2-3 days per week and focus on muscular endurance with higher repetitions, using light hand weights, resistance bands or tubing, and body weight. Flexibility training can be done daily to help increase range of motion and avoid stiffness from inactivity. Although youths can benefit from exercise training during cancer, more studies are needed across different age groups and types of cancers.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Fourth Annual Showcase of Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavors (SOURCE), Winthrop University, April 2018

Course Assignment

EXSC-511-Wojcik

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Apr 20th, 2:15 PM Apr 20th, 4:15 PM

Exercise Programming for Pediatric Cancer Patients

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

Pediatric cancer occurs at a rate of 17 per 100,000 children, from infancy to adolescence. The most common pediatric cancers are acute lymphoblastic leukemia, nervous system and brain tumors, and Hodgkin lymphoma. These children go through a great deal to continue their lives as they were before they were diagnosed, so keeping a regular exercise and play schedule is crucial for them. Physical activity at least 60 minutes per day is recommended for youths by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Trained exercise physiologists and occupational therapists can lead exercise to benefit physical and mental health. Although research is limited, studies have found exercise in pediatric cancer generally to be safe. If youths cannot perform 60 minutes at one time, they should exercise in short bouts of 10 minutes and gradually increase duration. Their symptoms and fatigue will limit them, and they may need to avoid exercise on most chemotherapy days, except for light stretching. They can participate in walking or cycling, play games, dance, and use cardio equipment. They will require much slower progression in their intensity or duration of exercise. Resistance training can occur 2-3 days per week and focus on muscular endurance with higher repetitions, using light hand weights, resistance bands or tubing, and body weight. Flexibility training can be done daily to help increase range of motion and avoid stiffness from inactivity. Although youths can benefit from exercise training during cancer, more studies are needed across different age groups and types of cancers.