Event Title

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: What We Know

Poster Number

079

Faculty Mentor

Joni Boyd, Ph.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Physical Education, Sport, and Human Performance

Location

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

Start Date

20-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 4:15 PM

Description

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive disease that is found in the brain. CTE is extremely dangerous and can be life-threatening to athletes. It can cause cerebral lobe damage, depression/anxiety, headaches/migraines, and memory loss. Recently, studies have shown that CTE is most prevalent in high-contact sports, specifically football. CTE has been found in football at various age levels, including high school, college, and the NFL. Most CTE cases have been found in the NFL, due to the increased exposure to contact, especially at high-contact positions such as linebackers, running backs and wide receivers. Even after retirement, NFL players have reported suffering from the side effects of CTE. The purpose of this review is to provide evidence-based information on prevention strategies, signs and symptoms, and long-term effects of CTE. A better understanding of CTE among coaches, trainers, and athletes can progress the development of prevention and treatment.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Fourth Annual Showcase of Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavors (SOURCE), Winthrop University, April 2018

Course Assignment

PESH 381-Boyd

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 2:15 PM Apr 20th, 4:15 PM

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: What We Know

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive disease that is found in the brain. CTE is extremely dangerous and can be life-threatening to athletes. It can cause cerebral lobe damage, depression/anxiety, headaches/migraines, and memory loss. Recently, studies have shown that CTE is most prevalent in high-contact sports, specifically football. CTE has been found in football at various age levels, including high school, college, and the NFL. Most CTE cases have been found in the NFL, due to the increased exposure to contact, especially at high-contact positions such as linebackers, running backs and wide receivers. Even after retirement, NFL players have reported suffering from the side effects of CTE. The purpose of this review is to provide evidence-based information on prevention strategies, signs and symptoms, and long-term effects of CTE. A better understanding of CTE among coaches, trainers, and athletes can progress the development of prevention and treatment.