Title of Abstract

Review of ACL Injuries in Female Athletes

Poster Number

077

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Physical Education, Sport, and Human Perfromance

Faculty Mentor

Joni Boyd, Ph.D.

Abstract

There is evidence to suggest that female athletes have a higher occurrence of ACL injuries than male athletes. A better understanding of mechanisms behind ACL injuries in females is critical; thus, the purpose of this review was to identify potential factors that lead to higher ACL injury rates in female athletes. Evidence suggests that women have less knee flexion angles, more knee valgus angles, greater quadriceps activation, and lower hamstring activation compared to male athletes. The altered knee pattern with women puts more pressure or “increases the load” on the ACL function. Other evidence suggests that proprioceptive preventive strength training could help decrease the number of ACL injuries in female athletes. Additional evidence suggests that the impact of varying hormone levels on knee joint laxity could also explain why female athletes sustain ACL injuries more often than male athletes. The information from this review can help coaches and players to better understand the causes of ACL injuries in female athletes, and potentially work towards effective injury-prevention strategies.

Course Assignment

PESH 381-Boyd

Previously Presented/Performed?

Fourth Annual Showcase of Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavors (SOURCE), Winthrop University, April 2018

Start Date

20-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 4:15 PM

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Apr 20th, 2:15 PM Apr 20th, 4:15 PM

Review of ACL Injuries in Female Athletes

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

There is evidence to suggest that female athletes have a higher occurrence of ACL injuries than male athletes. A better understanding of mechanisms behind ACL injuries in females is critical; thus, the purpose of this review was to identify potential factors that lead to higher ACL injury rates in female athletes. Evidence suggests that women have less knee flexion angles, more knee valgus angles, greater quadriceps activation, and lower hamstring activation compared to male athletes. The altered knee pattern with women puts more pressure or “increases the load” on the ACL function. Other evidence suggests that proprioceptive preventive strength training could help decrease the number of ACL injuries in female athletes. Additional evidence suggests that the impact of varying hormone levels on knee joint laxity could also explain why female athletes sustain ACL injuries more often than male athletes. The information from this review can help coaches and players to better understand the causes of ACL injuries in female athletes, and potentially work towards effective injury-prevention strategies.