Event Title

Understanding Rest and Recovery Protocols for Power

Poster Number

074

Faculty Mentor

Joni Boyd, Ph.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Physical Education, Sport, and Human Perfromance

Location

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

Start Date

20-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 4:15 PM

Description

The purpose of this review of literature was to analyze current and relevant research involving rest and recovery protocols for power, specifically, shortened rest periods and the effects of supplemental aerobic training on power output. This was examined through comparing active and passive recovery protocols. Active recovery (AR) is generally considered low-intensity and low-volume exercise performed after training sessions or between training days as a means to speed up the recovery process. AR can be an umbrella term for several methods of recovery; however, for the purpose of this review, AR will be in reference to low-intensity aerobic training. Passive recovery (PR), also known as complete recovery, contrasts this method in that any kind of stressor is removed from the environment so that the body may undertake a more relaxed process. Both recovery protocols have been shown to be beneficial to power output. This comprehensive review examines published research to compare the effects of recovery to power output. Additional research suggest that power output can be sustained or even improved without massive amounts of rest, a notion that is not generally accepted. Together, these two concepts may have significant implications in the training of explosive athletes (e.g., football players, soccer players, and sprinters).

Previously Presented/Performed?

Fourth Annual Showcase of Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavors (SOURCE), Winthrop University, April 2018

Course Assignment

PESH 381-Boyd

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Apr 20th, 2:15 PM Apr 20th, 4:15 PM

Understanding Rest and Recovery Protocols for Power

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

The purpose of this review of literature was to analyze current and relevant research involving rest and recovery protocols for power, specifically, shortened rest periods and the effects of supplemental aerobic training on power output. This was examined through comparing active and passive recovery protocols. Active recovery (AR) is generally considered low-intensity and low-volume exercise performed after training sessions or between training days as a means to speed up the recovery process. AR can be an umbrella term for several methods of recovery; however, for the purpose of this review, AR will be in reference to low-intensity aerobic training. Passive recovery (PR), also known as complete recovery, contrasts this method in that any kind of stressor is removed from the environment so that the body may undertake a more relaxed process. Both recovery protocols have been shown to be beneficial to power output. This comprehensive review examines published research to compare the effects of recovery to power output. Additional research suggest that power output can be sustained or even improved without massive amounts of rest, a notion that is not generally accepted. Together, these two concepts may have significant implications in the training of explosive athletes (e.g., football players, soccer players, and sprinters).