Event Title

Turn Stress into Sweat: The Effects of Physical Activity Classes on Stress in College Students

Poster Number

073

Faculty Mentor

Janet Wojcik, Ph.D

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Physical Education, Sport, and Human Performance

Location

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

Start Date

20-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 4:15 PM

Description

While stress is unavoidable, many college students face overwhelming levels of stress and lack proper stress management skills. Increased levels of stress can lead to poor mental and physical health, as well as poor academic performance. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of physical activity classes on stress levels in college students. Four male students and forty-four female students (n = 51) over the age of 18 participated in this study. Surveys were distributed to participants in “for-credit” and recreational physical activity classes offered by Winthrop University. This study employed a modified version of the Physical Activity and Stress Survey (PASS). The survey was modified to include the short-version International Physical Activity Questionnaires (IPAQ) and questions asking participants to identify race/ethnicity, the class name, and whether it was for credit or recreational. Students in recreational classes reported higher levels of stress coming into the class compared to students in for-credit classes (M = 2.5 ± 0.7 versus 1.9 ± 0.9; p = 0.011). There was no difference in student stress levels upon leaving class or other variables. Students participating in recreational classes took a higher number of physical activity classes than students enrolled in for-credit classes. There were no differences by race. IPAQ data showed that students participated in 3.1 ± 1.6 days of physical activity per week. Students who participate in recreational physical activity classes may do so to manage stress. Students in for-credit classes may feel less stress upon arriving to class.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Fourth Annual Showcase of Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavors (SOURCE), Winthrop University, April 2018

Grant Support?

Supported by a Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program grant from the U.S. Department of Education

Awards Won

Honorable Mention, Fifth Annual Black Doctoral Network Conference, October 2017

Comments

Kellie is a McNair Scholar

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Apr 20th, 2:15 PM Apr 20th, 4:15 PM

Turn Stress into Sweat: The Effects of Physical Activity Classes on Stress in College Students

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

While stress is unavoidable, many college students face overwhelming levels of stress and lack proper stress management skills. Increased levels of stress can lead to poor mental and physical health, as well as poor academic performance. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of physical activity classes on stress levels in college students. Four male students and forty-four female students (n = 51) over the age of 18 participated in this study. Surveys were distributed to participants in “for-credit” and recreational physical activity classes offered by Winthrop University. This study employed a modified version of the Physical Activity and Stress Survey (PASS). The survey was modified to include the short-version International Physical Activity Questionnaires (IPAQ) and questions asking participants to identify race/ethnicity, the class name, and whether it was for credit or recreational. Students in recreational classes reported higher levels of stress coming into the class compared to students in for-credit classes (M = 2.5 ± 0.7 versus 1.9 ± 0.9; p = 0.011). There was no difference in student stress levels upon leaving class or other variables. Students participating in recreational classes took a higher number of physical activity classes than students enrolled in for-credit classes. There were no differences by race. IPAQ data showed that students participated in 3.1 ± 1.6 days of physical activity per week. Students who participate in recreational physical activity classes may do so to manage stress. Students in for-credit classes may feel less stress upon arriving to class.