Event Title

The Importance of Profanity

Poster Number

065

Presenter Information

John Kroft, Winthrop University

Faculty Mentor

Jo Koster, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

English

Location

Richardson Ballroom

Start Date

20-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 4:15 PM

Description

This paper examines some of the myths and connotations associated with taboo language, while stressing the benefits that this type of language has to offer. In particular, this paper examines the place of profanity in society, in the United States military, and the sociolinguistic milieu of the two. The thesis forwarded is that the corporate workforce could only benefit from the removal of the taboo and stigmas surrounding profanity. Some of the benefits that such language has to offer are an increase in pain tolerance, helping to form interpersonal and social bonds, and establishing a social hierarchy. Profanity, of course, has negative aspects, such as the following: women use profanity less frequently than men do and are thus not establishing their place in the social hierarchy the same way that men do; children learn profanity quickly at a young age, usually at home, but they are still punished for using such language, girls more so than boys; and there is a societal assumption that those who use profanity are less intelligent than those who do not. The legality and morality of profane language are examined, and determined that though there are military regulations and FCC guidelines prohibiting its use, there is no moral reason not to use taboo language when not broadcasting on mass media outlets.

Course Assignment

ENGL 507 – Koster

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Apr 20th, 2:15 PM Apr 20th, 4:15 PM

The Importance of Profanity

Richardson Ballroom

This paper examines some of the myths and connotations associated with taboo language, while stressing the benefits that this type of language has to offer. In particular, this paper examines the place of profanity in society, in the United States military, and the sociolinguistic milieu of the two. The thesis forwarded is that the corporate workforce could only benefit from the removal of the taboo and stigmas surrounding profanity. Some of the benefits that such language has to offer are an increase in pain tolerance, helping to form interpersonal and social bonds, and establishing a social hierarchy. Profanity, of course, has negative aspects, such as the following: women use profanity less frequently than men do and are thus not establishing their place in the social hierarchy the same way that men do; children learn profanity quickly at a young age, usually at home, but they are still punished for using such language, girls more so than boys; and there is a societal assumption that those who use profanity are less intelligent than those who do not. The legality and morality of profane language are examined, and determined that though there are military regulations and FCC guidelines prohibiting its use, there is no moral reason not to use taboo language when not broadcasting on mass media outlets.