Event Title

Synthesis of Novel Oxazoline Compounds for Use as Insecticides and the Evaluation for Mosquitocidal and Larvalcidal Activity

Poster Number

058

Presenter Information

Ansley Nemeth, Winthrop University

Faculty Mentor

Bruce Melancon, Ph.D., University of Notre Dame

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Chemistry, Physics, and Geology

Location

Richardson Ballroom

Start Date

20-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 4:15 PM

Description

The extreme rise of vector-borne infectious diseases such as the Dengue and Zika viruses has become an increasing threat to global health. While these diseases have been around for quite some time, there have been increasing issues with combating them. The mosquitoes that carry these diseases have become more resistant to the insecticides on the market. Many therapies used to combat these diseases are expensive, hard to supply in the field, and have various serious side effects. Apart from yellow fever, there are no vaccines on the market for vector-transmitted diseases. Our goal as a lab is to create insecticides that can combat resistant misquotes. To do this, we are taking known compounds and making analogs of them. These compounds specifically target a G-coupled protein receptor in the mosquito that is required for movement and reproduction. Prior literature proved that the protein had been targeted by oxazoline insecticide molecules, which showed effectiveness against aphids and mites. Using the oxazoline synthesis as a framework, we altered the chemical structures that we believe may affect the interaction and conformational change that occurs in the octopamine receptor and synthesized seven novel oxazoline compounds. The purity of the compounds was assessed using analytical techniques such as LC-MS, TLC, and 1H NMR. The newly synthesized compounds were tested through in vitro and in vivo assays. It was thought the compounds would have effectiveness against the mosquitoes, but through the assays it was shown the compounds had no larvalcidal or mosquitocidal activity.

Previously Presented/Performed?

College of Science Undergraduate Research Symposium, University of Notre Dame, July 2017; American Chemical Society National Meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana, March 2018

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Apr 20th, 2:15 PM Apr 20th, 4:15 PM

Synthesis of Novel Oxazoline Compounds for Use as Insecticides and the Evaluation for Mosquitocidal and Larvalcidal Activity

Richardson Ballroom

The extreme rise of vector-borne infectious diseases such as the Dengue and Zika viruses has become an increasing threat to global health. While these diseases have been around for quite some time, there have been increasing issues with combating them. The mosquitoes that carry these diseases have become more resistant to the insecticides on the market. Many therapies used to combat these diseases are expensive, hard to supply in the field, and have various serious side effects. Apart from yellow fever, there are no vaccines on the market for vector-transmitted diseases. Our goal as a lab is to create insecticides that can combat resistant misquotes. To do this, we are taking known compounds and making analogs of them. These compounds specifically target a G-coupled protein receptor in the mosquito that is required for movement and reproduction. Prior literature proved that the protein had been targeted by oxazoline insecticide molecules, which showed effectiveness against aphids and mites. Using the oxazoline synthesis as a framework, we altered the chemical structures that we believe may affect the interaction and conformational change that occurs in the octopamine receptor and synthesized seven novel oxazoline compounds. The purity of the compounds was assessed using analytical techniques such as LC-MS, TLC, and 1H NMR. The newly synthesized compounds were tested through in vitro and in vivo assays. It was thought the compounds would have effectiveness against the mosquitoes, but through the assays it was shown the compounds had no larvalcidal or mosquitocidal activity.