Event Title

The Relationship between Osteonal Geometry and Physiological Stresses (Compression versus Tension) in the Cranial and Caudal Aspects of White-Tailed Deer Proximal Humerus

Poster Number

039

Faculty Mentor

Meir Barak, Ph.D, D.V.M.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Biology

Location

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

Start Date

20-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 4:15 PM

Description

Remodeling refers to the continued biological process of resorbing primary bone tissue and replacing it with a bone structure known as “secondary osteon” (or Haversian system). The aim of this study was to investigate and quantify bone remodeling in the proximal humerus of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). We hypothesized that the cranial and caudal aspects of the proximal humerus, which are subjected to tension and compression, respectively, would demonstrate significantly different osteonal geometry, differing in characteristics such as size, circularity, and angle. Four proximal humeri cross-sections were embedded, polished, and then inspected with a polarizing microscope and stereoscope to determine areas of remodeling in the cranial and caudal aspects. Next, a scanning electron microscope was used to take high-resolution pictures of the caudal and cranial aspects. Finally, ImageJ© was used to count and assess the secondary osteons’ geometries. Our results revealed that the secondary osteons in the cranial aspect, which is subjected to tension, were significantly larger, less circular, and angled more medially, with relatively smaller central canals compared to secondary osteons in the caudal aspect, which is subjected to compression. These results are in line with previous studies showing smaller secondary osteons in areas subjected to compression. The conclusions of our study demonstrate the relationship between bone structure and function, and support the concept of bone functional adaptation.

Previously Presented/Performed?

South Carolina INBRE Symposium, Columbia, South Carolina, October 2017

Grant Support?

Supported by an SC INBRE grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIH-NIGMS)

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Apr 20th, 2:15 PM Apr 20th, 4:15 PM

The Relationship between Osteonal Geometry and Physiological Stresses (Compression versus Tension) in the Cranial and Caudal Aspects of White-Tailed Deer Proximal Humerus

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

Remodeling refers to the continued biological process of resorbing primary bone tissue and replacing it with a bone structure known as “secondary osteon” (or Haversian system). The aim of this study was to investigate and quantify bone remodeling in the proximal humerus of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). We hypothesized that the cranial and caudal aspects of the proximal humerus, which are subjected to tension and compression, respectively, would demonstrate significantly different osteonal geometry, differing in characteristics such as size, circularity, and angle. Four proximal humeri cross-sections were embedded, polished, and then inspected with a polarizing microscope and stereoscope to determine areas of remodeling in the cranial and caudal aspects. Next, a scanning electron microscope was used to take high-resolution pictures of the caudal and cranial aspects. Finally, ImageJ© was used to count and assess the secondary osteons’ geometries. Our results revealed that the secondary osteons in the cranial aspect, which is subjected to tension, were significantly larger, less circular, and angled more medially, with relatively smaller central canals compared to secondary osteons in the caudal aspect, which is subjected to compression. These results are in line with previous studies showing smaller secondary osteons in areas subjected to compression. The conclusions of our study demonstrate the relationship between bone structure and function, and support the concept of bone functional adaptation.