Event Title

The Implementation of 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Biomedical Research, Education, and Community Service at a Primarily Undergraduate Institution

Poster Number

042

Faculty Mentor

Matthew Stern, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of Biology

Location

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

Start Date

20-4-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 4:15 PM

Description

Technologies such as 3D printing and 3D bioprinting are becoming increasingly common in biomedical research. These technologies hold great promise for the production of custom devices, including living bioengineered products, that improve the lives of patients. The production of advanced bioengineered products requires the combined expertise of several fields, including engineering and biology. However, introduction to technologies such as 3D printing and 3D bioprinting is not common for undergraduate biology students, particularly those at primarily undergraduate institutions (PUIs). Here, we describe a project in which undergraduate students employed a 3D printer and a 3D bioprinter for research purposes, while also demonstrating their potential to be used in undergraduate biology education. A relatively inexpensive Flashforge Creator Pro was used to 3D print objects for research and educational use and will serve as the platform to introduce Winthrop biology students to basic 3D printing technology. A BioBot1 was used in our 3D bioprinting work and will also be used to introduce students in select Winthrop biology courses to bioprinting technology. In addition, we have established the Giving Hands student organization, which will be a Winthrop-based chapter of the e-NABLE community – a global organization whose members volunteer to 3D print and distribute mechanical hands for individuals with upper limb differences. Together, these efforts have established the infrastructure required to introduce Winthrop biology students to 3D printing, 3D bioprinting, the workflow involved in each (design, programming/software, troubleshooting), and the many applications of these technologies within the biological sciences.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Association of Southeastern Biologists (ASB) Annual Meeting, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, March 2018

Grant Support?

Supported by SC INBRE and INBRE Developmental Research Project grants from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIH-NIGMS), and by grants from the Winthrop University Research Council

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Apr 20th, 2:15 PM Apr 20th, 4:15 PM

The Implementation of 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Biomedical Research, Education, and Community Service at a Primarily Undergraduate Institution

Richardson Ballroom (DIGS)

Technologies such as 3D printing and 3D bioprinting are becoming increasingly common in biomedical research. These technologies hold great promise for the production of custom devices, including living bioengineered products, that improve the lives of patients. The production of advanced bioengineered products requires the combined expertise of several fields, including engineering and biology. However, introduction to technologies such as 3D printing and 3D bioprinting is not common for undergraduate biology students, particularly those at primarily undergraduate institutions (PUIs). Here, we describe a project in which undergraduate students employed a 3D printer and a 3D bioprinter for research purposes, while also demonstrating their potential to be used in undergraduate biology education. A relatively inexpensive Flashforge Creator Pro was used to 3D print objects for research and educational use and will serve as the platform to introduce Winthrop biology students to basic 3D printing technology. A BioBot1 was used in our 3D bioprinting work and will also be used to introduce students in select Winthrop biology courses to bioprinting technology. In addition, we have established the Giving Hands student organization, which will be a Winthrop-based chapter of the e-NABLE community – a global organization whose members volunteer to 3D print and distribute mechanical hands for individuals with upper limb differences. Together, these efforts have established the infrastructure required to introduce Winthrop biology students to 3D printing, 3D bioprinting, the workflow involved in each (design, programming/software, troubleshooting), and the many applications of these technologies within the biological sciences.