Event Title

The Role of Social Support and Stress in Positive Engagement and Burnout in Youth Sports

Poster Number

022

Faculty Mentor

Donna Nelson, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Psychology

Location

Rutledge

Start Date

20-4-2018 12:00 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 2:00 PM

Description

Participation in youth sports has been linked to benefits such as high physical self-esteem, enhanced social skills, and academic achievement. However, some athletes are plagued by distress and burnout. More research is needed to explain these contradictory outcomes in order to identify mechanisms for promoting beneficial athletic experiences for young people. We surveyed 18 male and 41 female young adults who reported recent participation in high school athletics. Participants responded to the Sport Engagement Questionnaire, the Athlete Burnout Questionnaire, the Student-Athlete Life Stress Scale, and the Perceived Social Support in Sport Scale. When social support was low, athletes under high stress reported less engagement (M = 3.31) than those experiencing low levels of stress (M = 4.36). Engagement did not vary as a function of stress for those with high social support, F(1, 57) = 4.58, p < 0.03. Similarly, when social support was low, athletes under high stress reported more burnout (M = 3.03) than those experiencing low stress (M = 1.88). Burnout did not vary as a function of stress for those with high social support, F(1,57) = 11.24, p < 0.001. Our findings demonstrate that the experience of stress predicts both low engagement and high burnout in youth sports. However, perceived social support proved to serve as a moderator of these effects

Previously Presented/Performed?

Southeastern Psychological Association (SEPA) Annual Meeting, Charleston, South Carolina, March 2018

Awards Won

Psi Chi Regional Research Award, SEPA Annual Meeting, March 2018

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Apr 20th, 12:00 PM Apr 20th, 2:00 PM

The Role of Social Support and Stress in Positive Engagement and Burnout in Youth Sports

Rutledge

Participation in youth sports has been linked to benefits such as high physical self-esteem, enhanced social skills, and academic achievement. However, some athletes are plagued by distress and burnout. More research is needed to explain these contradictory outcomes in order to identify mechanisms for promoting beneficial athletic experiences for young people. We surveyed 18 male and 41 female young adults who reported recent participation in high school athletics. Participants responded to the Sport Engagement Questionnaire, the Athlete Burnout Questionnaire, the Student-Athlete Life Stress Scale, and the Perceived Social Support in Sport Scale. When social support was low, athletes under high stress reported less engagement (M = 3.31) than those experiencing low levels of stress (M = 4.36). Engagement did not vary as a function of stress for those with high social support, F(1, 57) = 4.58, p < 0.03. Similarly, when social support was low, athletes under high stress reported more burnout (M = 3.03) than those experiencing low stress (M = 1.88). Burnout did not vary as a function of stress for those with high social support, F(1,57) = 11.24, p < 0.001. Our findings demonstrate that the experience of stress predicts both low engagement and high burnout in youth sports. However, perceived social support proved to serve as a moderator of these effects