Event Title

A Phonetical Analysis of the Allophones of the Phonemes /d/ and /g/ between a Native and Non-Native Speaker of Spanish

Poster Number

024

Presenter Information

Elizabeth McAbeeFollow

Faculty Mentor

Valerie Jepson, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Department of World Languages and Cultures

Location

Rutledge

Start Date

20-4-2018 12:00 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 2:00 PM

Description

A phoneme is a distinct sound that differentiates one word from another. Not every phoneme has an allophone, a variant of a single phoneme. Unlike a phoneme, an allophone does not change or affect the meaning of a word; it only affects the pronunciation of a word. The phonemes /d/ and /g/ in Spanish both contain one phoneme, and two allophones, /d/ and /ð/, and /g/ and /ɣ/, respectively. The phonemes /d/ and /g/ are taught when learning the pronunciation of the alphabet in the Spanish language and the allophones are typically self-learned with experience or indulgence within a Spanish-speaking culture. As a result, native speakers of Spanish tend to have a different pronunciation of phonemes and allophones than non-native speakers who have only been taught Spanish pronunciation in terms of phonemes. I hypothesized that the phonemes /ð/ and /ɣ/ would not be found in a voice analysis of a non-native speaker’s pronunciation, due to the lack of experience and exposure to speaking Spanish. This hypothesis was investigated by analyzing the phonemic and allophonic pronunciation of the phonemes in question with voice analysis software, (i.e., Praat). Speech samples of each phoneme were extracted from continuous speech. Results include graphics and statistical analysis of the differences and similarities of the pronunciation of the two participants. My hypothesis was confirmed.

Previously Presented/Performed?

Fourth Annual Showcase of Undergraduate Research and Creative Endeavors (SOURCE), Winthrop University, April 2018

Course Assignment

(SPAN 405 – Jepson)

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Apr 20th, 12:00 PM Apr 20th, 2:00 PM

A Phonetical Analysis of the Allophones of the Phonemes /d/ and /g/ between a Native and Non-Native Speaker of Spanish

Rutledge

A phoneme is a distinct sound that differentiates one word from another. Not every phoneme has an allophone, a variant of a single phoneme. Unlike a phoneme, an allophone does not change or affect the meaning of a word; it only affects the pronunciation of a word. The phonemes /d/ and /g/ in Spanish both contain one phoneme, and two allophones, /d/ and /ð/, and /g/ and /ɣ/, respectively. The phonemes /d/ and /g/ are taught when learning the pronunciation of the alphabet in the Spanish language and the allophones are typically self-learned with experience or indulgence within a Spanish-speaking culture. As a result, native speakers of Spanish tend to have a different pronunciation of phonemes and allophones than non-native speakers who have only been taught Spanish pronunciation in terms of phonemes. I hypothesized that the phonemes /ð/ and /ɣ/ would not be found in a voice analysis of a non-native speaker’s pronunciation, due to the lack of experience and exposure to speaking Spanish. This hypothesis was investigated by analyzing the phonemic and allophonic pronunciation of the phonemes in question with voice analysis software, (i.e., Praat). Speech samples of each phoneme were extracted from continuous speech. Results include graphics and statistical analysis of the differences and similarities of the pronunciation of the two participants. My hypothesis was confirmed.