Event Title

Understanding the Effectiveness of Dry Needling in Upper and Lower Extremities

Poster Number

014

Faculty Mentor

Joni Boyd, Ph.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Physical Education, Sport, and Human Performance

Location

Rutledge

Start Date

20-4-2018 12:00 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 2:00 PM

Description

The purpose of this review is to understand the effectiveness of dry needling in the upper and lower extremities. Dry needling is a relatively new technique that is used by athletes, physical therapists, athletic trainers, strength coaches, and physicians for rehabilitation. When using this procedure, an acupuncture needle is inserted into the participant’s skin and muscle to reduce myofascial trigger point (TrP). When a person has myofascial pain, he or she has an irritated area in the muscle that restricts range of motion and affects muscle activation. There is evidence to support the effectiveness of dry needling with stretching. Other evidence has compared the effect of dry needling on upper to lower extremities of the body. When using dry needling in the upper trapezius, participants had greater range of motion two days later; however, they experienced muscle soreness. There are also findings that compared the different types of dry needling. While some articles showed no significant difference when using dry needling, others did. Research has shown significant differences when using dry needling, such as increased pain intensity in the upper trapezius, pressure pain threshold, lower scores on the Disability of Arm, Hand and Shoulder, and the visual analogue assessments. Physicians should know if dry needling, stretching, or even manual compression work best for their clients. More research should be conducted to make sure dry needling is more effective than other procedures.

Course Assignment

PESH 381 – Boyd

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Apr 20th, 12:00 PM Apr 20th, 2:00 PM

Understanding the Effectiveness of Dry Needling in Upper and Lower Extremities

Rutledge

The purpose of this review is to understand the effectiveness of dry needling in the upper and lower extremities. Dry needling is a relatively new technique that is used by athletes, physical therapists, athletic trainers, strength coaches, and physicians for rehabilitation. When using this procedure, an acupuncture needle is inserted into the participant’s skin and muscle to reduce myofascial trigger point (TrP). When a person has myofascial pain, he or she has an irritated area in the muscle that restricts range of motion and affects muscle activation. There is evidence to support the effectiveness of dry needling with stretching. Other evidence has compared the effect of dry needling on upper to lower extremities of the body. When using dry needling in the upper trapezius, participants had greater range of motion two days later; however, they experienced muscle soreness. There are also findings that compared the different types of dry needling. While some articles showed no significant difference when using dry needling, others did. Research has shown significant differences when using dry needling, such as increased pain intensity in the upper trapezius, pressure pain threshold, lower scores on the Disability of Arm, Hand and Shoulder, and the visual analogue assessments. Physicians should know if dry needling, stretching, or even manual compression work best for their clients. More research should be conducted to make sure dry needling is more effective than other procedures.