Event Title

Alternatives to the Causes, Cures, and Reasonings of the Black Death in Europe, Compared to Medieval Religions’ Official Positions

Poster Number

008

Faculty Mentor

Gregory D. Bell, Ph.D.

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

History

Location

Rutledge

Start Date

20-4-2018 12:00 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 2:00 PM

Description

Several accomplished authors including George Decaux, Phillip Zeigler, Johannes Nohl, and later, Ole Benedictow, attempted to compile all the information about the Black Death and its later recurrences into one complete source. Until Benedictow, most attempts failed to completely understand how the Plague affected Europe. Some authors only focused on the Plague in England or France, or only on the consequences of the Plague. Even after Benedictow’s valued contributions, there still is no single volume that accurately covers the entire spectrum of believed causes. The Black Death is the deadliest pandemic in the history of Western Civilization; although its consequences have been adequately discussed, a compilation of all the Plague’s attributed, accepted, erroneous, or dismissed causes has not. This research fills that niche by showing what people living then (1348-1800) theorized about why this catastrophe occurred and continued to occur. This work seeks to categorize, survey, and create a compilation of all the Emic perspectives (perspectives concerning the Plague, by those who experienced the Plague) through the interpretation of primary and secondary source materials regarding the alternative causes, cures, or reasons behind why the Black Death occurred. This research is divided into themes, including pagan perspectives; medical perspectives; persecutions; and alternative, secular, or radical perspectives It also contrasts the major medieval religions’ official positions concerning where the Plague came from; why Christians and other religious people were suffering; how to combat (exercise demons) and prevent the Plague (prayer); whether God was causing the Plague and, if so, how to gain favor.

Course Assignment

HIST 550 – Bell

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Alternatives to the Causes, Cures, and Reasonings of the Black Death in Europe, Compared to Medieval Religions’ Official Positions

Rutledge

Several accomplished authors including George Decaux, Phillip Zeigler, Johannes Nohl, and later, Ole Benedictow, attempted to compile all the information about the Black Death and its later recurrences into one complete source. Until Benedictow, most attempts failed to completely understand how the Plague affected Europe. Some authors only focused on the Plague in England or France, or only on the consequences of the Plague. Even after Benedictow’s valued contributions, there still is no single volume that accurately covers the entire spectrum of believed causes. The Black Death is the deadliest pandemic in the history of Western Civilization; although its consequences have been adequately discussed, a compilation of all the Plague’s attributed, accepted, erroneous, or dismissed causes has not. This research fills that niche by showing what people living then (1348-1800) theorized about why this catastrophe occurred and continued to occur. This work seeks to categorize, survey, and create a compilation of all the Emic perspectives (perspectives concerning the Plague, by those who experienced the Plague) through the interpretation of primary and secondary source materials regarding the alternative causes, cures, or reasons behind why the Black Death occurred. This research is divided into themes, including pagan perspectives; medical perspectives; persecutions; and alternative, secular, or radical perspectives It also contrasts the major medieval religions’ official positions concerning where the Plague came from; why Christians and other religious people were suffering; how to combat (exercise demons) and prevent the Plague (prayer); whether God was causing the Plague and, if so, how to gain favor.