Event Title

Cluster Assignment of Novel Mycobacteriophages Using Tape Measure Protein (TMP) Gene

Poster Number

002

Faculty Mentor

Kristi Westover, Ph.D., and Victoria Frost, Ph.D

College

College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Biology

Location

Rutledge

Start Date

20-4-2018 12:00 PM

End Date

20-4-2018 2:00 PM

Description

Mycobacteriophages are taxonomically organized by morphological features and genome comparisons. We used a PCR system with subcluster-specific primers that screens for the Tape Measure Protein (TMP) gene. This methodology allows assignment of novel phages into their appropriate clusters without having to sequence the whole genome. The TMP gene, which codes for the major phage tail structural component, is universally found in all phages, and has proven to be effective in determining phage phylogeny. There are currently 17 known clusters and 30 sub-clusters. The goal of this study is to phylogenetically assign novel mycobacteriophages found in fresh water and soil in York County, South Carolina. This single-gene method for preliminary prediction could allow for phylogenetic investigation of phages from complex samples quickly and effectively. To be able to characterize phages prior to full genome sequencing is a useful tool in assessing which phages are significantly unique to require further genetic investigation.

Course Assignment

BIOL 471 – Frost

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Apr 20th, 12:00 PM Apr 20th, 2:00 PM

Cluster Assignment of Novel Mycobacteriophages Using Tape Measure Protein (TMP) Gene

Rutledge

Mycobacteriophages are taxonomically organized by morphological features and genome comparisons. We used a PCR system with subcluster-specific primers that screens for the Tape Measure Protein (TMP) gene. This methodology allows assignment of novel phages into their appropriate clusters without having to sequence the whole genome. The TMP gene, which codes for the major phage tail structural component, is universally found in all phages, and has proven to be effective in determining phage phylogeny. There are currently 17 known clusters and 30 sub-clusters. The goal of this study is to phylogenetically assign novel mycobacteriophages found in fresh water and soil in York County, South Carolina. This single-gene method for preliminary prediction could allow for phylogenetic investigation of phages from complex samples quickly and effectively. To be able to characterize phages prior to full genome sequencing is a useful tool in assessing which phages are significantly unique to require further genetic investigation.