WEST 219 Session I, 12:45-2:15 p.m.
Schedule

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2018
Friday, April 20th
12:45 PM

How Differing Cultural Attitudes towards Leisure Affect How Travel is Marketed towards American versus French Audiences

Emily Leamy, Winthrop University

West 219

12:45 PM

In 2016, Americans as a whole forfeited 206 million of their paid vacation days, which numbered from zero to an average of 16 days per person in the private sector. Conversely, French workers receive approximately 31 paid vacation days a year, and 89 percent of their population takes their vacation days. Because of this obvious cultural difference in regards to vacation time, tourism companies need to vary their marketing cross-culturally to these audiences. Consumers in general are motivated to travel from both external and internal sources, and previous studies and literature prove that these motivations are taken into account when planning marketing strategies. However, literature has yet to investigate how consumers’ cultural attitudes towards leisure time affect how travel is marketed. This research seeks to understand how cultural differences in attitudes towards leisure time affect how travel is marketed cross-culturally, specifically towards French versus American audiences. Through a content analysis and cross-cultural consumer survey, we will analyze the differences in cultural attitudes towards work and leisure time, determining if they affect marketing strategies taken by tourism companies towards French and American audiences. This study will serve as information for tourism companies that market towards French and American audiences, as well as marketing professionals who seek information on cross-cultural approaches to the field.

1:00 PM

Internship and Research Impacts on Biology Students’ Aptitude for Postgrduate Success

Zina Weaver, Winthrop University

West 219

1:00 PM

In recent years, there has been frequent discussion concerning whether undergraduate programs are adequately preparing students for their respective careers or postgraduate endeavors. Internship experiences are being explored as one form of preparation. In one study, business alumni rated previous internship experience as having better prepared them for their careers compared to academic curricula in measures that are frequently valued by employers, such as relationship building and creative thinking. Furthermore, a recent study demonstrated that resumes with internship experiences had a 14% increase in the rate of interview requests for business positions. Internship experience has been demonstrated to benefit students across a variety of undergraduate disciplines with varying demographics. At Winthrop University, biology students are not required to participate in internships in order to graduate; however, they can earn course credit for internships within their curriculum. Therefore, this survey study was completed to determine if senior biology students at Winthrop University felt like they had obtained skills associated with post-graduate success and whether this was correlated with previous internship experience. The hypothesis was that students with internship experience would report a higher comfort level with soft skills and therefore, better career preparation. These results were then compared to student demographics to see if there was a significant relationship.

1:15 PM

Workplace Sabbaticals: A History, Current Practice, and Propositions for Future Research

Suzannah Way, Winthrop University

West 219

1:15 PM

According to the Society for Human Resource Management, approximately 17% of companies in 2017 reported having some form of sabbatical program as a part of their benefits packages. However, to date, there is very little research on the topic of workplace sabbaticals for corporate and non-academic jobs. The purpose of this study is to learn more about the history and aims of workplace sabbaticals, to better understand the elements of sabbatical programs that are likely to inform their effectiveness, and to develop propositions for future research on workplace sabbaticals. The study starts with a review of the existing literature on workplace sabbaticals. Then, it examines the structural parameters of sabbaticals offered by 103 employers (e.g., purpose, length, eligibility, compensation, training and preparation, acceptable use of time during sabbatical, intended benefits, return on investment). Finally, using literature on stress, recovery and creativity, and corporate social responsibility, I develop propositions for future research into corporate sabbatical programs.

1:30 PM

The Influence of Daily Leisure Activities on Stress and Work-Family Balance

Michael Szeman, Winthrop University

West 219

1:30 PM

For many years, work-life literature has focused almost exclusively on the interaction between the work and family domains, without much consideration for the time spent in-between. This daily diary study examines the influence of time spent engaged in daily leisure activities on the health and well-being of full-time workers through its observed effect on daily mood, as well as day-to-day perceptions of stress, work-family conflict (WFC), and work-family balance (WFB). This study contributes to previous literature by providing day-level analysis of these variables, thereby offering a closer examination of their interrelated natures. Building on research on mood repair and stress recovery, we hypothesize that time spent on daily leisure is positively associated with positive affect (PA) and perceptions of WFB, and negatively associated with negative affect (NA) and perceptions of stress and WFC.

1:45 PM

Food and Consumption in Francophone Literature

Cole Heatherly, Winthrop University

West 219

1:45 PM

Francophone authors use the symbolism of food and the act of consumption as a means of exploring postcolonial life and culture. In the postcolonial Francophone world, where native cultural identities were suppressed by French colonists, many authors and their characters use food to express themselves when their native languages or cultures are negated and might otherwise be forgotten. The existing body of scholarship on food in literature has noted the potential food has to function as a means of expression. My study seeks to expand this sometimes narrowly focused vein of study and to demonstrate the crucial role food plays in a diverse body of literature from the global Francophone diaspora. In these cultures, food is an important, concrete representation of culture and this is expressed in African novelist Calixthe Beyala's How to Cook-up Your Husband the African Way, in which the protagonist states plainly, "Food is synonymous with life." Through my discussion of the portrayal of food in a diverse cross-section of works by Antillean authors Edouard Glissant, Maryse Condé, Gisèle Pineau, and Aimé Cesiare, Lebanese-Canadian writer Abla Farhoud, and French-Cameroonian author Beyala, I will establish links between the role food plays in these different cultures and show how, despite colonization, food functions – not just within the confines of specific Francophone regions, but across the Francophone world – as a universal language that transcends borders.