WEST 214 Session I, 12:45-2:15 p.m.
Schedule

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2018
Friday, April 20th
12:45 PM

All Talk, But No Action: A Reexamination of Education in South Carolina’s “Corridor of Shame”

LaRaven Temoney, Winthrop University

Faculty Mentor: Laura Ullrich, Ph.D.

West 214

12:45 PM

South Carolina’s “Corridor of Shame” is an area of rural and poverty-stricken communities that stretches along Interstate 95. This area has received large amounts of media attention since the release of a documentary, entitled Corridor of Shame – The Neglect of South Carolina’s Rural Schools, about it and a visit from then Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama. In 2014, the Supreme Court of the State of South Carolina ruled that a “minimally adequate” education was not ensured for these school districts. However, no major legislative action has been taken to equalize the educational playing field. The purpose of this research project is to analyze whether or not changes were made that had positive effects on the overall quality of education. Examining different variables (e.g. poverty index, absolute rating, teacher salaries), and other available data shows that a “minimally adequate” education has still not been provided for all students and has contributed to the continuous economic instability in these areas.

1:00 PM

Promoting a President: Tone in Presidential Candidate Correspondence via Twitter

Eva Owusu, Winthrop University

Faculty Mentor: Sabrina Habib, Ph.D.

West 214

1:00 PM

The purpose of this research is to provide insight into the changes of integrated marketing communications in a political environment and the impact of different tones in a presidential campaign. Using the Twitter correspondence of the Republican and Democratic nominees, a content analysis was used to discover positive and negative tones and themes during the 2016 presidential election. Data were collected from the end of the primary elections to election day in November 2016. This research also builds on previous studies focused on the growing impact of social media in political communications. The findings from this study include: (1) Hillary Clinton tweeted at Donald Trump more frequently then he tweeted at her. (2) Hillary Clinton had mostly neutral twitter correspondence towards Donald Trump, who in return used a more negative tone. (3) The theme of Clinton’s tweets were in reference to the character and qualifications of Donald Trump, while the majority of Trump’s tweets toward Clinton referenced her character. (4) The majority of the candidates’ tweets that referenced each other’s character and qualifications were negative.

1:15 PM

Incorporating Academic Blogging into a Fifth Grade Classroom: Integrating Technology and Science into Literacy Instruction

Cassidy Tallman, Winthrop University

West 214

1:15 PM

There is a growing need to better prepare students for twenty-first-century literacy demands. Integrating technology into education improves student achievement and increases students’ technological literacy. Classroom blogging is one way to provide students authentic experiences with technology while integrating literacy. The goal of this project was to examine fifth graders’ interactions with text, fifth graders’ perceptions of academic blogging, and science content integration in literacy instruction. Over the course of seven weeks, students participated in shared reading lessons and blogging sessions. Data were collected on students’ acquisition of science content knowledge, students’ interactions with text, and students’ perceptions of technology integration. Findings revealed that students reported positive experiences with text when using technology, and students’ knowledge of science content increased.

1:30 PM

The Validity and Reliability of Using Pinterest as a Source for Early Childhood Math Lesson Plans

Cali Lewis, Winthrop University

West 214

1:30 PM

The primary goal of this research paper is to communicate the findings of eighty-four quantitative entries and one hundred and one qualitative entries detailing the reliability and validity of using the social media platform Pinterest as a legitimate means for planning math lessons for students in pre-K through second grade. In order to prove its relative reliability and validity, the papers of education students enrolled in the course Teaching Mathematics in Early Childhood Education (ECED 350) at Winthrop University in Spring and Fall 2017 were collected, evaluated, and analyzed. Each individual paper included ten pins, each falling under a particular math strand and a corresponding grade level, and each evaluated based on whether they did or did not meet eight different pieces of educational criteria; these data was represented quantitatively by a “1” or a “2” based on whether they met (1) or did not meet (2) the criteria. In addition, each student was required to answer four questions regarding their typical use of Pinterest and other media sources, as well as their findings from their own research. These qualitative data were organized based on the answers and how frequently they occurred. The preliminary findings revealed that there was a strong presence of active engagement in the lesson plans evaluated, but a lack of opportunities for student responses and respect for all students. The findings of this paper are important in that they will guide future educators in how and with what frequency they use Pinterest and other social media platforms to guide their lessons.

2:00 PM

Alternative Texts in the Math Classroom: Exploring Sphereland

Christina Knight, Winthrop University

West 214

2:00 PM

Improving student literacy has become an increasingly important educational goal in the last decade. South Carolina, for example, recently adopted Read to Succeed legislation that requires teachers to receive special training on how to incorporate literacy into their specific content areas. One method of improving literacy is to incorporate alternative texts that provide supplementary reading beyond the classroom textbook. This is especially useful in mathematics, where students have difficulty understanding the high density, symbolic language associated with the subject. The alternative text used for this study was Sphereland by Dionysus Burger, a fictional novella that couples an interesting tale of discovery with geometry, trigonometry, dimensions, and relativity. Along with two related animated movies produced by Flat World Productions, the researchers for this project used Sphereland to develop supplementary lessons for Algebra 1 and 2, Geometry, Precalculus, and Calculus courses. Ten high school teachers and 13 mathematics classes used these lessons over two semesters. This project examines the constructed lessons, survey results from the 209 students, and feedback from the participating teachers.

2:15 PM

Poster Number: 107

Voting Rights, the Klan, and Race in Stella by Starlight

Asia Conyers, Winthrop University

Faculty Mentor: Margaret Gillikin, Ph.D.

West 214

2:15 PM - 4:45 PM

This study examines interdisciplinary teaching, which provides students the opportunity to work with and apply knowledge from multiple disciplines organized around an overall theme or problem. The purpose of this research is to explore ways to integrate two subjects effectively for an interdisciplinary lesson. Teaching interdisciplinary lessons helps encourage students to go beyond the typical restrictions of just one content area, and it helps them to become more creative, focus on critical thinking, and work on communication skills. My research will include teacher-written blogs, scholarly articles, and interviews with several middle school educators about the impact of interdisciplinary teaching in their classrooms. In addition, my project will include a unit plan integrating the subjects of social studies and language arts to teach the novel Stella by Starlight by Sharon Draper, which takes place during the 1930s. The student-oriented lessons will emphasize reading comprehension and allow the students to apply the book’s concepts to their daily lives. For social studies, the students will explore topics such as voter disenfranchisement, the Ku Klux Klan, the Great Depression, and segregation, by using primary and secondary sources. The skills the students will gain from language arts will be interpreting and analyzing the author’s use of words, phrases and conventions; articulating ideas and perspectives in a logical sequence; using evidence to build arguments; and transacting with texts to formulate questions and explanations and to consider alternative/multiple perspectives.