Event Title

Parent Knowledge on Concussion Education

Faculty Mentor

Joni Boyd, Ph.D.

College

College of Education

Department

Department of Physical Education, Sport, and Human Performance

Location

West 214

Start Date

20-4-2018 3:15 PM

Description

The purpose of this review is to better understand parents’ knowledge of concussion education in youth sports. A concussion is a complex pathophysiological process affecting the brain, induced by traumatic biomechanical forces. Concussions alone are complex for even physicians to diagnosis; therefore, it is not surprising that parents commonly struggle to recognize symptoms. Results from several studies suggest that there should be required concussion prevention programs for students, parents, and coaches to complete prior to the season. In contrast, other studies explained that, if an athletic trainer chooses to follow the best practices when working alongside athletes to help them recover, sometimes the responsibility to detect signs of concussion then falls on the parent(s)/guardian(s). Other research studies suggest that athletic trainers create pamphlets that serve to educate parents on concussion prevention and recovery. A better understanding of parents’ knowledge on concussion causes, symptoms, treatment, and recovery is critical to work towards lowering the prevalence of concussions in youth sports.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 3:15 PM

Parent Knowledge on Concussion Education

West 214

The purpose of this review is to better understand parents’ knowledge of concussion education in youth sports. A concussion is a complex pathophysiological process affecting the brain, induced by traumatic biomechanical forces. Concussions alone are complex for even physicians to diagnosis; therefore, it is not surprising that parents commonly struggle to recognize symptoms. Results from several studies suggest that there should be required concussion prevention programs for students, parents, and coaches to complete prior to the season. In contrast, other studies explained that, if an athletic trainer chooses to follow the best practices when working alongside athletes to help them recover, sometimes the responsibility to detect signs of concussion then falls on the parent(s)/guardian(s). Other research studies suggest that athletic trainers create pamphlets that serve to educate parents on concussion prevention and recovery. A better understanding of parents’ knowledge on concussion causes, symptoms, treatment, and recovery is critical to work towards lowering the prevalence of concussions in youth sports.